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COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY, AND LIFE SCIENCES


Additional information on the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences can be found on the Web.

The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences offers a broad range of academic degree programs providing a sound knowledge base and technical expertise in the basic and applied sciences including the life sciences. The Bachelor of Science degree is available in 16 academic programs; the Bachelor of Arts is offered in Biological Sciences.

Preprofessional Health Studies non-degree programs are offered in Premedicine, Prepharmacy, Prerehabilitation Sciences, and Preveterinary Medicine. A bachelor's degree can be obtained by fulfilling additional requirements specified by the University.

The undergraduate academic programs include Agricultural and Applied Economics; Community and Economic Development; Agricultural Education; Agricultural Mechanization and Business; Animal and Veterinary Sciences with concentrations in Dairy Business, Equine Business, Food Animal Business, Poultry Business, and Preveterinary and Science; Aquaculture, Fisheries, and Wildlife Biology; Biochemistry; Biological Sciences; Biosystems Engineering; Environmental and Natural Resources with concentrations in Conservation Biology, Natural Resource and Economic Policy, and Natural Resources Management; Food Science; Forest Resource Management; Horticulture; Microbiology with a Molecular Biology concentration; Packaging Science; and Turfgrass.
 

Minors

Minors are available to students who wish to broaden their educational background and enhance their expertise. (Acceptable minors are listed below.)

Calhoun Honors College

Students with a cumulative grade-point ratio of 3.4 and above are urged to consider enrolling in the Calhoun Honors College. The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences offers Honors designated courses and an opportunity to do a research project under the direction of a faculty mentor in fulfillment of Departmental Honors. For more information, contact the Calhoun Honors College Office in Tillman Hall.

Scholarships

A range of scholarships is available to students who excel in their academic performance. Information on scholarships and financial aid can be obtained from specific departments in the College or from the Student Financial Aid Office in Sikes Hall.

Student Services

The college has a comprehensive Student Service Center offering a career library, company literature, career search technology, and video/audio resources.


AGRICULTURAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS

Bachelor of Science

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

The Agricultural Economics curriculum emphasizes a strong background in economics with applications to production agriculture, agribusiness, natural resources, and the environment. Courses are also in-cluded in basic agricultural and biological sciences, liberal arts, and business. Students have 18 hours of electives to use to further individual specialization or to broaden the educational experience.

Employment opportunities for graduates in Agricultural Economics are many and diverse. Private sector opportunities include agricultural production, banking, finance, marketing, and public relations. Public sector opportunities include national/local organizations, government agencies, educational institutions, and cooperative extension services. Graduates have also begun businesses or returned to family-owned businesses. This major also provides an excellent background for professional or graduate study in several disciplines.

Students in the Agricultural Economics curriculum take a basic set of courses during the freshman and sophomore years. During the junior and senior years, students concentrate in one of five emphasis areas: Agricultural Business, Economics, International Trade and Development, Production, and Real Estate. Students should select an emphasis area by the end of the sophomore year.

Freshman Year

First Semester

3 - AGRIC 103 Intro. to Animal Industries

3 - AGRIC 105 Agriculture and Society

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - MTHSC 102 Intro. to Mathematical Analysis

4 - Science Requirement1

16

Second Semester

3 - AGRIC 104 Introduction to Plant Sciences

3 - AP EC 202 Agricultural Economics

3 - CP SC 120 Intro. to Information Technology

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

4 - Science Requirement1

16

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - AP EC 302 Economics of Farm Management

3 - ECON 212 Principles of Macroeconomics

3 - Accounting Requirement2

6 - Humanities Requirement E.1 and E.21

3 - Elective

18

Second Semester

3 - AP EC 308 Quantitative Applied Economics

3 - AP EC 309 Econ. of Agricultural Marketing

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics

3 - Accounting Requirement2

3 - Oral Communication Requirement1

3 - Elective

18

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - ECON 314 Intermediate Microeconomics

3 - EX ST 462 Statistics Applied to Economics

3 - R S 301 Rural Sociology or

3 - R S (SOC) 459 The Community
3 - Emphasis Area3

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement1

15

Second Semester

3 - AP EC 420 World Agricultural Trade or

3 - AP EC 460 Agricultural Finance
3 - ECON 302 Money and Banking or
3 - ECON 315 Intermediate Macroeconomics
3 - LAW 312 Commercial Law or
3 - LAW 322 Legal Environment of Business
6 - Emphasis Area3

3 - Elective

18

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - AP EC 402 Production Economics

3 - AP EC (CSENV) 426 Crop. Systems Analysis

3 - AP EC 452 Agricultural Policy

3 - Emphasis Area3

3 - Elective

15

Second Semester

3 - AP EC 456 Prices

6 - Emphasis Area3

6 - Elective

15

131 Total Semester Hours

1See General Education Requirements.
2ACCT 201 and 202 or 307.
3See advisor. An emphasis area should be selected by the end of the sophomore year in consultation with advisor. Select 18 credits from one of the following:

Agricultural Business--MGT 301, 307, MKT 301, and nine credits from a department approved list.

Economics--ECON 430, MTHSC 207, 210, and nine credits from a department approved list.

International Trade and Development--Six credits of AP EC 490 or two courses of the same foreign language, ECON 310 or 412, and nine credits from a department approved list.

Production--Eighteen credits from a department approved list.

Real Estate--AP EC 313, 413, FIN 307, 417, and six credits from a department approved list.


AGRICULTURAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS

Bachelor of Science

COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

The Bachelor of Science program in Community and Economic Development provides career opportunities for social science administration, management, outreach, and research. A Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Community and Economic Development facilitates employment with local, state, regional, federal, and international agencies; research and consulting firms; financial institutions; foundations and councils; public and private utilities; and organizations requiring entrepreneurial skills. This major provides an excellent background for professional and graduate study in several disciplines.

Associations between natural resources and social, economic, and political institutions are investigated. The Community and Economic Development curriculum provides the conceptual, analytical, and pragmatic qualifications to succeed as an economic development specialist. Students receive practical training, and internships are available to complement coursework.

Freshman Year

First Semester

3 - AGRIC 105 Agriculture and Society

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - MTHSC 102 Intro. to Mathematical Analysis

3 - PO SC 102 Introduction to Global Issues

4 - Science Requirement1

16

Second Semester

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - GEOG 103 World Regional Geography

3 - Computer Skills Requirement2

3 - Humanities Requirement E.22

4 - Science Requirement1

16

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - ACCT 201 Financial Accounting Concepts

3 - AP EC 202 Agricultural Economics or

3 - ECON 211 Principles of Microeconomics

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics

3 - Humanities Requirement E.12

3 - Oral Communication Requirement2

15

Second Semester

3 - AP EC 257 Natural Resources, Environment, and Economics

3 - ECON 212 Principles of Macroeconomics

3 - R S 301 Rural Sociology

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement2

4 - Elective

16

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - AP EC 352 Public Finance

3 - C R D (AP EC, HLTH) 361 Introduction to Health-Care Economics

3 - EX ST 462 Statistics Applied to Economics

5 - Emphasis Area3

3 - Social Science Requirement4

17

Second Semester

3 - C R D 357 Natural Resources Economics

3 - MKT 301 Principles of Marketing

3 - Advanced Social Science Requirement5

3 - Emphasis Area3

4 - Elective

16

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - C R D (AP EC) 411 Regional Impact Analysis

3 - R S (SOC) 471 Demography

3 - Advanced Marketing Requirement6

3 - Emphasis Area3

3 - Planning Requirement7

2 - Elective

17

Second Semester

3 - C R D (AP EC) 412 Spatial Competition and Rural Development

3 - C R D (AP EC) 491 Internship, Agribusiness, and Community and Rural Development

3 - R S (SOC) 401 Human Ecology or

3 - R S (SOC) 459 The Community

6 - Emphasis Area3

15

128 Total Semester Hours

1A two-semester sequence in the same physical or biological science, each including a laboratory.
2See General Education Requirements.
3See advisor.
4Select from 300-level courses in geography, history, political science, psychology, or sociology.
5Select from 400-level courses in geography, history, political science, psychology, or sociology.
6MKT 314, 423, 427, 428, or 429.
7C R P 411, 415, or 472.


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION

Bachelor of Science

Agricultural Education provides broad preparation in agricultural sciences and professional education, including communications and human relations skills. In addition to required courses, students may select a minor. (See below.)

The Bachelor's degree prepares students for professional education positions in the mainstream of agriculture including teaching, cooperative extension service, and government agricultural agencies. This degree also prepares students for other educational work such as agricultural missionary, public relations, and training officers in agricultural industry.

Freshman Year

First Semester

1 - AG ED 102 Agric. Ed. Freshman Seminar

3 - AG ED 200 Agric. Applic. of Microcomputers

4 - BIOL 103 General Biology I

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement1

2 - Elective

16

Second Semester

1 - AG ED 100 Orientation and Field Experience

3 - AG ED 103 Multiculturalism in Agric. Ed.

4 - BIOL 104 General Biology II

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - Humanities Requirement E.22

3 - Elective

17

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - AG ED 201 Intro. to Agricultural Education

3 - AP EC 202 Agricultural Economics

4 - CH 101 General Chemistry or

4 - CH 105 Beg. Gen. and Organic Chemistry
3 - Oral Communication Requirement2

3 - Elective

16

Second Semester

1 - AG ED 202 Agric. Ed. Sophomore Seminar

4 - AG ED 203 Teaching Agriscience

3 - AG M 205 Principles of Farm Shop

4 - CH 102 General Chemistry or

4 - CH 106 Beg. Gen. and Organic Chemistry

4 - CSENV 202 Soils

3 - HORT 212 Introduction to Turfgrass Culture

19

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - AG ED 303 Mech. Technology for Agric. Ed.

3 - AG ED 403 Prin. of Adult/Ext. Education or

3 - AG ED 440 Program Dev. in Adult/Ext. Ed.
3 - AP EC 302 Economics of Farm Management

4 - AVS 202 Introductory Animal Sciences or

3 - PRTM 301 Recreation and Society or

3 - W F B 412 Wildlife Management

3 - HORT 303 Plant Materials

15-16

Second Semester

1 - AG ED 302 Agric. Education Junior Seminar

3 - ED F 302 Educational Psychology

3 - FOR 305 Elements of Forestry or

3 - FOR 315 Woodland Ecology

3 - HORT 208 Landscape Appreciation

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement1

3 - Humanities Requirement E.12

16

Senior Year

First Semester

1 - AG ED 400 Supervised Field Experience II

3 - AG ED 401 Methods in Agricultural Ed.

1 - AG ED 402 Agric. Education Senior Seminar

3 - AG ED 404 Biotechnology in Agric. Ed.

2 - AG ED 425 Teaching Agricultural Mechanics

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement2

3 - Elective

16

Second Semester

12 - AG ED 406 Directed Teaching or

12 - AG ED 407 Internship in Extension and Leadership Education
2 - AG ED 423 Curriculum

14

129-130 Total Semester Hours

1Select from MTHSC 101, 102, 106, 108, 203, 207, EX ST 301. MTHSC 101 and EX ST 301 are recommended.
2See General Education Requirements.


AGRICULTURAL MECHANIZATION AND BUSINESS

Bachelor of Science

The Agricultural Mechanization and Business major provides a program for students who desire training in areas relevant to dynamic agricultural enterprise. The program is organized with strength in both business management and technical support of agriculture and agribusiness. To produce well rounded individuals with good communication skills, the curriculum includes courses in the humanities, social sciences, English composition, and public speaking.

Graduates in Agricultural Mechanization and Business find meaningful and remunerative employment in a variety of situations directly and indirectly related to agricultural production, processing, marketing, and the many services connected therewith. Farming and technical sales in the agricultural, industrial, and heavy equipment industries are frequently chosen careers.

By completing this curriculum, graduates will have fulfilled the requirements for an Agricultural Business Management minor. Contact the Student Records Office to have the minor recorded.

Freshman Year

First Semester

1 - AG M 101 Introduction to Ag. Mechanzation

3 - AGRIC 103 Intro. to Animal Industries

4 - BIOL 103 General Biology I

4 - CH 101 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement1

18

Second Semester

3 - AGRIC 104 Introduction to Plant Sciences

4 - BIOL 104 General Biology II

4 - CH 102 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement1

17

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - AG M 205 Principles of Farm Shop

3 - AP EC 202 Agricultural Economics

4 - PHYS 207 General Physics I

3 - Computer Skills Requirement2

3 - Literature Requirement3

16

Second Semester

3 - ACCT 201 Financial Accounting Concepts

3 - AG M 206 Agricultural Mechanization

3 - AG M 303 Calculations for Mechanized Agric.

2 - E G 209 Intro. to Engr./Comp. Graphics

4 - PHYS 208 General Physics II

3 - Social Science Requirement4

18

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - AG M 301 Soil and Water Conservation

3 - AG M 406 Mechanical and Hydraulic Systems

3 - AP EC 302 Economics of Farm Management

3 - Minor5

3 - Social Science Requirement4

3 - Elective

18

Second Semester

3 - AP EC 309 Econ. of Agricultural Marketing

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

4 - CSENV 202 Soils

3 - Humanities Requirement E.22

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement2

16

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - AG M 402 Drainage, Irrig. and Waste Mgt.

3 - AG M 452 Farm Power

3 - AG M 460 Farm and Home Utilities

1 - AG M 472 Seminar

3 - AP EC 319 Agribusiness Management

3 - Minor5

16

Second Semester

1 - AG M 401 Environmental Control for Plants and Animals

2 - AG M 403 Structures for Plants and Animals

3 - AG M 408 Equipment Sales and Service

3 - Agriculture Requirement6

7 - Elective

16

135 Total Semester Hours

1A minimum of six credits selected from EX ST 301 or MTHSC 101; MTHSC 102; MTHSC 106.
2See General Education Requirements.
3ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
4Select from ED F 302, GEOG 101, 301, 302, HIST 101, 102, 172, 173, PO SC 101, PSYCH 201, SOC 201, (R S) 401, or any AP EC or R S courses.
5Select from Agricultural Business Management minor list.
6See advisor.


ANIMAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES

Bachelor of Science

The curriculum in Animal and Veterinary Sciences provides students with a broad base of understanding of scientific principles and the application of these principles to scientific, technical, and business phases of livestock and poultry production, processing, and marketing. Completion of general education requirements, basic sciences, applied sciences, and student-selected courses of personal interest prepares graduates well for successful careers. All students complete a common freshman year; the curriculum is then divided into five concentrations: Dairy Business, Equine Business, Food Animal Business, Poultry Business, and Preveterinary and Science. Each concentration includes specialized courses unique to students pursuing careers in those fields.

Many opportunities are available to Animal and Veterinary Sciences graduates, including production, sales and marketing, business management, advertising, extension, meat and dairy industry, and teaching. Graduates in the Preveterinary and Science Concentration also meet all requirements for admission to graduate and professional schools including the veterinary medicine programs for the University of Georgia and Tuskegee University.

Freshman Year Program

First Semester

1 - AVS 100 Orientation to AVS

4 - AVS 202 Introductory Animal Sciences

4 - BIOL 103 General Biology I or

5 - BIOL 110 Principles of Biology I
4 - CH 101 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

16-17

Second Semester

1 - AVS 108 Animal and Dairy Science Techniques

4 - BIOL 104 General Biology II or

5 - BIOL 111 Principles of Biology II
4 - CH 102 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - MTHSC 102 Intro. to Math. Analysis or

4 - MTHSC 106 Calculus of One Variable I
15-17

DAIRY BUSINESS CONCENTRATION

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - ACCT 201 Financial Accounting Concepts

1 - AVS 203 Dairy Science Techniques

4 - CSENV 202 Soils

4 - SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish

3 - Computer Skills Requirement1

3 - Humanities Requirement E.11

18

Second Semester

3 - AP EC 202 Agricultural Economics

3 - AVS 310 Animal Disease and Sanitation

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

4 - SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish

1 - Animal Techniques Requirement2

3 - Elective

17

Junior Year

First Semester

4 - AN PH 301 Physiology and Anatomy of Domestic Animals

3 - AP EC 302 Econ. of Farm Management

3 - AVS 370 Principles of Animal Nutrition

4 - AVS 404 Dairy Cattle Feeding and Mgt.3

4 - MICRO 305 General Microbiology

18

Second Semester

2 - AVS 302 Principles of Livestock Selection

3 - AVS 375 Applied Animal Nutrition

2 - AVS 461 Physiology of Lactation

3 - CSENV 423 Field CropForages

1 - Animal Techniques Requirement2

3 - Business Requirement4

3 - Humanities Requirement E.21

1 - Elective

18

Senior Year

First Semester

2 - AVS 406 Seminars and Related Topics

4 - AVS 430 Dairy Processing I

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics

4 - Animal Production Requirement5

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement1

16

Second Semester

3 - AVS 453 Animal Reproduction

3 - AVS 470 Animal Breeding

3 - Business Requirement4

7 - Elective6

16

134-137 Total Semester Hours

1See General Education Requirements.
2See advisor. Select from AVS 120, 204, 210.
3Taught in the fall semester of even-numbered years; may be taken in the senior year. See advisor for scheduling alternatives.
4See advisor. Select from AG M 205, 401, 402, 403, 460, AGRIC (EN SP) 315, AP EC 309, 319, 351, 409, 433, 460, CSENV (B E) 408, ECON 211, 212, EN SP 432, LAW 312, 313, MGT 301, 307.
5See advisor. Select from AVS 401, 402, 408, 412, 431. May be taken either first or second semester of senior year.
6Electives may be taken in the first semester of the senior year if necessary.
 

EQUINE BUSINESS CONCENTRATION

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - ACCT 201 Financial Accounting Concepts

3 - AP EC 202 Agricultural Economics

1 - AVS 204 Horse Care Techniques

4 - SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish

3 - Computer Skills Requirement1

3 - Humanities Requirement E.11

17

Second Semester

3 - AGRIC 104 Intro. to Plant Sciences or

4 - CSENV 202 Soils
2 - AVS 205 Light Horse Management

3 - AVS 310 Animal Disease and Sanitation

4 - SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish

1 - Animal Techniques Requirement2

3 - Humanities Requirement E.21

1 - Elective

17-18

Junior Year

First Semester

4 - AN PH 301 Physiology and Anatomy of Domestic Animals

3 - AP EC 302 Econ. of Farm Management

3 - AVS 370 Principles of Animal Nutrition

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics

1 - Animal Techniques Requirement2

3 - Elective

17

Second Semester

2 - AVS 302 Principles of Livestock Selection

2 - AVS 309 Principles of Equine Evaluation

3 - AVS 375 Applied Animal Nutrition

2 - AVS 385 Equine Behavior and Training

3 - AVS 453 Animal Reproduction

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

3 - CSENV 423 Field CropForages

18

Senior Year

First Semester

2 - AVS 406 Seminars and Related Topics

3 - AVS 407 Equine Theriogenology

4 - Animal Production Requirement3

3 - Business Requirement4

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement1

2 - Elective

17

Second Semester

4 - AVS 412 Horse Production

3 - AVS 470 Animal Breeding

3 - MGT 307 Personnel Management

3 - Business Requirement4

4 - Elective5

17

134-138 Total Semester Hours

1See General Education Requirements.
2See advisor. Select from AVS 120, 203, 210.
3See advisor. Select from AVS 401, 402, 404, 408.
4See advisor. Select from AG M 205, 401, 402, 403, 460, AGRIC (EN SP) 315, AP EC 309, 319, 351, 409, 433, 460, CSENV (B E) 408, ECON 211, 212, EN SP 432, LAW 312, 313, MGT 301.
5Electives may be taken in the first semester of the senior year if necessary.
 

FOOD ANIMAL BUSINESS CONCENTRATION

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - ACCT 201 Financial Accounting Concepts

3 - AP EC 202 Agricultural Economics

1 - AVS 210 Animal Science Techniques

4 - SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish

3 - Computer Skills Requirement1

3 - Humanities Requirement E.11

17

Second Semester

3 - AVS 310 Animal Disease and Sanitation

4 - CSENV 202 Soils

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics

4 - SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish

1 - Animal Techniques Requirement2

3 - Elective3

18

Junior Year

First Semester

4 - AN PH 301 Physiology and Anatomy of Domestic Animals

3 - AP EC 302 Econ. of Farm Management

3 - AVS 370 Principles of Animal Nutrition

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

1 - Animal Techniques Requirement2

3 - Elective3

17

Second Semester

2 - AVS 302 Principles of Livestock Selection

2 - AVS 353 Meats

1 - AVS 354 Meats Laboratory

3 - AVS 375 Applied Animal Nutrition

3 - AVS 453 Animal Reproduction

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement1

3 - Elective3

17

Senior Year

First Semester

2 - AVS 406 Seminars and Related Topics

4 - Animal Production Requirement4

6 - Business Requirement5

3 - Humanities Requirement E.21

3 - Elective3

18

Second Semester

3 - AVS 470 Animal Breeding

3 - MGT 307 Personnel Management

4 - Animal Production Requirement4

3 - Business Requirement5

3 - Elective3,6

16

134-137 Total Semester Hours

1See General Education Requirements.
2See advisor. Select from AVS 120, 203, 204.
3Students opting to use elective hours to pursue a minor should inform their advisors early in their academic careers.
4See advisor. Select from AVS 401 or 408; and 402, 404, or 412.
5See advisor. Select from AG M 205, 401, 402, 403, 460, AGRIC (EN SP) 315, AP EC 309, 319, 351, 409, 433, 460, CSENV (B E) 408, 423, ECON 211, 212, EN SP 432, LAW 312, 313, MGT 301.
6Electives may be taken in the first semester of the senior year if necessary.
 

POULTRY BUSINESS CONCENTRATION

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - ACCT 201 Financial Accounting Concepts

3 - AP EC 202 Agricultural Economics

1 - AVS 120 Poultry Techniques

4 - SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish

3 - Computer Skills Requirement1

3 - Humanities Requirement E.11

17

Second Semester

3 - AVS 310 Animal Disease and Sanitation

2 - AVS 323 Poultry and Poultry Products Eval.

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics

4 - SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish

1 - Animal Techniques Requirement2

3 - Humanities Requirement E.21

1 - Elective

17

Junior Year

First Semester

4 - AN PH 301 Physiology and Anatomy of Domestic Animals

3 - AP EC 302 Econ. of Farm Management

3 - AVS 370 Principles of Animal Nutrition

2 - AVS 400 Avian Physiology3

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

3 - Business Requirement4

18

Second Semester

2 - AVS 302 Principles of Livestock Selection

3 - AVS 375 Applied Animal Nutrition

3 - AVS 425 Poul. Products Grading and Tech.5

3 - AVS 453 Animal Reproduction

1 - Animal Techniques Requirement2

3 - Business Requirement4

3 - Elective

18

Senior Year

First Semester

2 - AVS 406 Seminars and Related Topics

3 - AVS 458 Avian Microbiol. and Parasitology

4 - Animal Production Requirement6

3 - Business Requirement4

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement1

1 - Elective

16

Second Semester

4 - AVS 402 Poultry Management

3 - MGT 307 Personnel Management

3 - Business Requirement4

7 - Elective7

17

134-137 Total Semester Hours

1See General Education Requirements.
2See advisor. Select from AVS 203, 204, 210.
3Taught in the fall semester of even-numbered years; may be taken in the senior year. See advisor for scheduling alternatives.
4See advisor. Select from AG M 205, 401, 402, 403, 460, AGRIC (EN SP) 315, AP EC 309, 319, 351, 409, 433, 460, CSENV (B E) 408, ECON 211, 212, EN SP 432, LAW 312, 313, MGT 301.
5Taught in alternate years; may be taken in the senior year. See advisor for scheduling alternatives.
6Select from AVS 401, 404, 408, 412. Some courses are taught on an alternate semester/year cycle. See advisor for scheduling alternatives.
7Electives may be taken in the first semester of the senior year if necessary.
 

PREVETERINARY AND SCIENCE CONCENTRATION

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - CH 223 Organic Chemistry

1 - CH 227 Organic Chemistry Lab.

4 - PHYS 207 General Physics I

1 - Animal Techniques Requirement1

6 - Humanities Requirement E.1 and E.22

3 - Elective3

18

Second Semester

3 - CH 224 Organic Chemistry

1 - CH 228 Organic Chemistry Lab.

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics

4 - PHYS 208 General Physics II

3 - Computer Skills Requirement2

3 - Social Science Requirement2

17

Junior Year

First Semester

4 - AN PH 301 Physiology and Anatomy of Domestic Animals

3 - AP EC 202 Agricultural Economics

3 - AVS 370 Principles of Animal Nutrition

3 - BIOCH 301 General Biochemistry

3 - GEN 302 Introductory Genetics

1 - GEN 303 Introductory Genetics Lab.

1 - Animal Techniques Requirement1

18

Second Semester

3 - AVS 310 Animal Disease and Sanitation

3 - AVS 375 Applied Animal Nutrition

3 - AVS 453 Animal Reproduction

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

4 - MICRO 305 General Microbiology

1 - Animal Techniques Requirement1

17

Senior Year

First Semester

2 - AVS 406 Seminars and Related Topics

4 - Animal Production Requirement4

3-4 - Animal Products Requirement5

8 - Elective3

17-18

Second Semester

3 - AVS 470 Animal Breeding

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement2

10 - Elective3, 6

16

134-138 Total Semester Hours

1See advisor. Select from AVS 120, 203, 204, 210.
2See General Education Requirements.
3Students opting to use elective hours to pursue a minor should inform their advisors early in their academic careers.
4Select from AVS 401, 402, 404, 408, 412. Some courses are taught on an alternate semester/year cycle. See advisor for scheduling alternatives. Tuskegee University Veterinary School requires three credits of poultry science.
5See advisor. Select from AVS 353/354, 425, 430. Some courses are taught on an alternate semester/year cycle. See advisor for scheduling alternatives.
6Electives may be taken in the first semester of the senior year if necessary.


AQUACULTURE, FISHERIES, AND WILDLIFE BIOLOGY

Bachelor of Science

Increased interest in conservation of natural resources and the environment and demand for seafood products and farm-raised fish have resulted in these areas becoming increasingly technical and requiring highly qualified wildlife and fisheries biologists. Greatest demands for graduates are in the areas of management, research, survey, and regulatory positions with state and federal agencies; industrial research and quality control laboratories; conservation, recreational, and other public service agencies; and private enterprises and fish farms.

The undergraduate curriculum provides a solid foundation for many careers in the sciences. The curriculum is strong in basic and applied sciences, communication skills, and the social sciences. In addition, six credit hours are available for field training with appropriate natural resource agencies. Students can satisfy coursework requirements for professional certification by the Wildlife Society and/or the American Fisheries Society.

Freshman Year

First Semester

4 - BIOL 103 General Biology I

4 - CH 101 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

1 - W F B 101 Introduction to Aquaculture, Fisheries, and Wildlife

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement1

1 - Elective

16

Second Semester

4 - BIOL 104 General Biology II

4 - CH 102 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

1 - W F B 102 Methods of Aquaculture, Fisheries, and Wildlife Biology

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement1

1 - Elective

16

Sophomore Year

First Semester

4 - CSENV 202 Soils

3 - W F B 300 Wildlife Biology

3 - Bioscience Requirement2

3 - Social Science Requirement1

3 - Elective

16

Second Semester

3 - W F B 350 Prin. of Fish and Wildlife Biology

3 - Bioscience Requirement2

3 - Computer Skills Requirement1

3 - Humanities Requirement E.11

3 - Social Science Requirement1

15

Junior Year

First Semester

4 - AN PH 301 Physiology and Anatomy of Domestic Animals

3 - ENGL 314 Technical Writing

4 - Approved Requirement3

3 - Humanities Requirement E.21

3 - Wildlife Requirement4

17

Second Semester

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics

3 - GEN 302 Introductory Genetics

3 - W F B 313 Conservation Biology

4 - Approved Requirement3

3 - Fisheries Requirement5

16

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - W F B 430 Wildlife Conservation Policy

4 - Approved Requirement3

3 - Botany Requirement6

3 - Ecology Requirement7

3 - Fisheries Requirement5

16

Second Semester

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

1 - W F B 499 Wildlife Biology and Fisheries Sem.

3 - Approved Requirement3

3 - Wildlife Requirement4

6 - Elective

16

128 Total Semester Hours

1See General Education Requirements. (EX ST 301 may not be used to satisfy the Mathematical Sciences Requirement.)
2Three credits from BIOSC 302 or 303, and three credits from 304 or 305.
3Fifteen credits from AG M 301, AP EC 257, 475, C R D 357 or any course in BIOL, BIOSC, EN SP, ENT, ENTOX, FOR, GEOL, MICRO, W F B. Other courses approved by advisor.
4Six credits from W F B 412, 414, 440, 462 or 493 (with advisor's approval).
5Six credits from W F B 416, 418, 450, or 493 (with advisor's approval).
6At least three credits from BIOSC 320, 406/407, FOR 205.
7BIOSC 441, 443, 446, or FOR 315.
 


BIOCHEMISTRY

Bachelor of Science

Biochemistry is the study of the molecular basis of life. To comprehend current biochemical information and make future contributions to our molecular understanding of life processes, students must obtain a broad background in biology and a firm foundation in chemistry, mathematics, and physics. This is the basis of the biochemistry curriculum.

The program provides an excellent educational background for professional school (medicine, dentistry, or veterinary medicine) and graduate school in biochemistry, molecular biology, or another biological science discipline. Graduates will find employment opportunities in the research and service programs of universities, medical schools, hospitals, research institutes, and industrial and government laboratories.

Freshman Year

First Semester

5 - BIOL 110 Principles of Biology I

4 - CH 101 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

4 - MTHSC 106 Calculus of One Variable I

16

Second Semester

5 - BIOL 111 Principles of Biology II

4 - CH 102 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

4 - MTHSC 108 Calculus of One Variable II

16

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - CH 223 Organic Chemistry

1 - CH 227 Organic Chemistry Lab.1

3 - GEN 302 Introductory Genetics

1 - GEN 303 Introductory Genetics Lab.

3 - PHYS 122 Physics with Calculus I

1 - PHYS 124 Physics Lab. I

3-4 Advanced Mathematics Requirement2

15-16

Second Semester

3 - BIOCH 301 General Biochemistry

3 - CH 224 Organic Chemistry

1 - CH 228 Organic Chemistry Lab.1

3 - PHYS 221 Physics with Calculus II

1 - PHYS 223 Physics Lab. II

3 - Humanities Requirement E.13

3 - Social Science Requirement3

17

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - BIOCH 431 Physical Approach to Biochem.

2 - BIOCH 433 General Biochemistry Lab. I

3 - CH 330 Introduction to Physical Chemistry4

3 - ENGL 314 Technical Writing

3 - Approved Requirement5

3 - Computer Skills Requirement3

17

Second Semester

3 - BIOCH 432 Biochemistry of Metabolism

2 - BIOCH 434 General Biochemistry Lab. II

2 - BIOCH 436 Nucleic Acid and Protein Biosyn.

3 - Approved Requirement5

3 - Humanities Requirement E.23

3 - Social Science Requirement3

16

Senior Year

First Semester

2 - BIOCH 491 Special Problems in Biochemistry6

3 - BIOSC 461 Cell Biology

3 - CH 313 Quantitative Analysis

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

1-2 - Advanced Laboratory Requirement7

4 - Elective

16-17

Second Semester

3 - BIOCH 491 Special Problems in Biochemistry6

2 - BIOSC 493 Senior Seminar

4 - Science Requirement8

7 - Elective

16

129-131 Total Semester Hours

1CH 225 may substitute for CH 227, and CH 226 may substitute for CH 228. In both cases, the additional hour of credit counts toward a science requirement.
2EX ST 301, MTHSC 206, 301, or 302.
3See General Education Requirements.
4CH 331 may be substituted.
5A one-year sequence in a foreign language (strongly recommended) or any humanities or social science courses listed in section E.2 or F of the General Education Requirements.
6To be taken over two semesters with the same faculty member.
7BIOSC 462 or CH 317.
8Select from courses in BIOSC, CH, CP SC, GEN, MTHSC, MICRO, PHYS, PL PA, or as approved by advisor in consultation with the biochemistry faculty.


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Bachelor of Science

Biology encompasses the broad spectrum of the modern life sciences, including the study of all aspects of life from the structure and function of the whole organism down to the subcellular levels and up through the interactions of organisms to the integrated existence of life on the entire planet. Descriptive, structural, functional, and evolutionary questions are explored through the hierarchy of the organization of life. Applications of current advances to the health and well-being of man and society, to nature and the continuation of earth as a balanced ecosystem, and to an appreciation of the place of natural science in our cultural heritage receive emphasis.

Majors in Biological Sciences receive classroom, laboratory, and field training in biology with an emphasis on chemistry, mathematics, and physics as necessary tools. The Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences curriculum prepares students for graduate study in any of the life science areas (such as agricultural sciences, biochemistry, botany, cell and molecular biology, conservation, ecology and environmental science, entomology, forestry, genetics, industrial and regulatory biology, microbiology, morphology, physiology, wildlife biology, and zoology; for the health professions (medicine, dentistry, etc.), veterinary medicine; and for science teaching.

Freshman Year

First Semester

5 - BIOL 110 Principles of Biology I1

1 - BIOSC 101 Frontiers in Biology I2

4 - CH 101 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

4 - MTHSC 106 Calculus of One Variable I

17

Second Semester

5 - BIOL 111 Principles of Biology II1

1 - BIOSC 102 Frontiers in Biology II2

4 - CH 102 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

4 - MTHSC 108 Calculus of One Variable II

17

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - CH 223 Organic Chemistry

1 - CH 227 Organic Chemistry Lab.

3 - CP SC 120 Intro. to Information Technology

4 - Animal or Plant Diversity Requirement3

3 - Humanities Requirement E.14

3 - Elective

17

Second Semester

3 - CH 224 Organic Chemistry5

3 - GEN 302 Introductory Genetics

1 - GEN 303 Introductory Genetics Lab.

4 - Animal or Plant Diversity Requirement3

3 - Social Science Requirement4

3 - Elective

17

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - BIOCH 301 General Biochemistry

1 - BIOCH 302 Molecular Biology Lab.5

3 - BIOSC 335 Evolutionary Biology

3 - ENGL 314 Technical Writing

4 - PHYS 207 General Physics I or

3 - PHYS 122 Physics with Calculus I and

1 - PHYS 124 Physics Lab. I6

3 - Social Science Requirement4

17

Second Semester

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

3 - PHIL 325 Philosophy of Science or

3 - PHIL 326 Science and Values

4 - PHYS 208 General Physics II or

3 - PHYS 221 Physics with Calculus II and

1 - PHYS 223 Physics Lab. II

3 - Major Requirement7

3 - Elective

16

Senior Year

First Semester

2 - BIOSC 493 Senior Seminar

12 - Major Requirement7

3 - Elective

17

Second Semester

14 - Major Requirement7

3 - Elective

17

135 Total Semester Hours

1BIOL 110 and 111 are strongly recommended; however, BIOL 103 may substitute for BIOL 110, and BIOL 104 may substitute for BIOL 111. The remaining 1-2 credits required must be satisfied by completing 1-2 extra credits from departmental course offerings at the 300 level or above; see advisor.
2If not completed in the freshman year, the required 1-2 credits must be satisfied by completing 1?2 extra credits from departmental course offerings at the 300 level or above; see advisor.
3At least one lecture course and associated laboratory must be completed for both Animal Diversity (BIOSC 302 plus 306 or BIOSC 303 plus 307) and for Plant Diversity (BIOSC 304 plus 308 or BIOSC 305 plus 309).
4See General Education Requirements.
5CH 228 may be substituted for BIOCH 302.
6Physics with calculus is a three-semester sequence. Students selecting this option may wish to take PHYS 222/224 in the senior year to complete the sequence.
7See advisor. At least one lecture course must be taken from each of the following areas: Ecology, Cell Biology, Physiology. Six credits of lab are required and must include a lab from each of two of the three core areas (Ecology, Cell Biology, and Physiology) to match the major core lecture course taken. The remaining courses may be selected from departmental course offerings at the 300 level or above.
 


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Bachelor of Arts

The Bachelor of Arts in Biological Sciences provides a strong foundation in biology and is ideal for students desiring a liberal education emphasizing an interdisciplinary approach to a thorough understanding of the life sciences.

Freshman Year

First Semester

5 - BIOL 110 Principles of Biology I1

1 - BIOSC 101 Frontiers in Biology I2

4 - CH 101 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

4 - Foreign Language Requirement3

17

Second Semester

5 - BIOL 111 Principles of Biology II1

1 - BIOSC 102 Frontiers in Biology II2

4 - CH 102 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

4 - Foreign Language Requirement3

17

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - HIST 172 Western Civilization

4 - MTHSC 106 Calculus of One Variable I

4 - Animal or Plant Diversity Requirement4

3 - Foreign Language Requirement3

3 - Literature Requirement5

17

Second Semester

3 - CP SC 120 Intro. to Information Technology

3 - GEN 302 Introductory Genetics

1 - GEN 303 Introductory Genetics Lab.

4 - MTHSC 108 Calculus of One Variable II or

3 - MTHSC 301 Stat. Theory and Meth. I
3 - Foreign Language Requirement3

3 - Literature Requirement5

16-17

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - BIOCH 210 Elementary Biochemistry

1 - BIOCH 211 Elementary Biochemistry Lab.

3 - BIOSC 335 Evolutionary Biology

3 - ENGL 314 Technical Writing

4 - PHYS 207 General Physics I

3 - Minor6

17

Second Semester

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

3 - HIST 173 Western Civilization

3 - PHIL 325 Philosophy of Science or

3 - PHIL 326 Science and Values

4 - PHYS 208 General Physics II

4 - Animal or Plant Diversity Requirement4

17

Senior Year

First Semester

2 - BIOSC 493 Senior Seminar

3 - Major Requirement7

6 - Minor6

6-5 - Elective

17-16

Second Semester

6 - Major Requirement7

6 - Minor6

4 - Elective

16

134 Total Semester Hours

1BIOL 110 and 111 are strongly recommended; however, BIOL 103 may substitute for BIOL 110, and BIOL 104 may substitute for BIOL 111. The remaining 1-2 credits required must be satisfied by completing 1-2 extra credits from departmental course offerings at the 300 level or above; see advisor.
2If not completed in the freshman year, the required 1-2 credits must be satisfied by completing 1-2 extra credits from departmental course offerings at the 300 level or above; see advisor.
3Four semesters of the same language are required.
4At least one lecture course and associated laboratory must be completed for both Animal Diversity (BIOSC 302 plus 306 or BIOSC 303 plus 307) and for Plant Diversity (BIOSC 304 plus 308 or BIOSC 305 plus 309).
5Select from sophomore literature courses (200-level only) or foreign language literature (300-level or higher).
6See minors.
7At least one lecture course must be taken from each of the following areas: Ecology, Cell Biology, Physiology.


BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING

Bachelor of Science

The Biosystems Engineering program is admin-istered jointly by the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences and the College of Engineering and Science. See College of Engineering and Science for the curriculum.


ENVIRONMENTAL AND NATURAL RESOURCES

Bachelor of Science

The Environmental and Natural Resources curriculum produces professionals who have a broad-based knowledge in natural resources and an ability to interact with other resource professionals to provide thoughtful solutions to environmental and natural resource problems. The world is blessed with an abundance of natural resources, but the problems associated with their conservation are immense. Protection of rare and endangered species, preventing and controlling invasions of exotics, protecting old growth forests, restoring degraded ecosystems, and balancing the resource demands of industry and the public are some of the environmental issues which are enmeshed in politicized environments.

Three concentations are offered within the Environmental and Natural Resources major. The Conservation Biology concentration is oriented toward students who desire a greater exposure to taxa, their habitats and their interrelationships. The Natural Resource and Economic Policy concentration provides more in-depth study in economics and policy applications. The Natural Resources Management concentration emphasizes both resource management and negotiation skills.

Graduates in Environmental and Natural Resources are well-prepared for further graduate studies in natural resources and related fields. Potential public sector employers of graduates include federal, state, and municipal resource management agencies, private industries impacting land and water resources, environmental management consulting firms, and various environmental advocacy groups.

Freshman Year

First Semester

4 - BIOL 103 General Biology I

4 - CH 101 General Chemistry

1 - E N R 101 Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resources I

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - MTHSC 102 Intro. to Mathematical Analysis

15

Second Semester

4 - BIOL 104 General Biology II

4 - CH 102 General Chemistry

1 - E N R 102 Introduction to Environmental and Natural Resources II

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - Elective

15

CONSERVATION BIOLOGY CONCENTRATION

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - AP EC 257 Natural Resources, Environment, and Economics

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

3 - W F B (BIOSC) 313 Conservation Biology

3 - Computer Skills Requirement1

3 - Humanities Requirement E.11

3 - Elective

18

Second Semester

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics

3 - GEN 302 Introductory Genetics

1 - GEN 303 Introductory Genetics Lab.

3-4 - Physical Environment Requirement2

3-4 - Taxonomy/Habitat Requirement3

3 - Elective

16-18

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - ENGL 314 Technical Writing

3 - Ecology Requirement4

3 - Humanities Requirement E.21

3-4 - Physiology Requirement5

3-4 - Taxonomy/Habitat Requirement3

15-17

Second Semester

3 - BIOSC 335 Evolutionary Biology

3 - E N R 302 Natural Resources Measurements

3 - Ecology Requirement4

3 - Natural Resource Economics Requirement6

3-4 - Taxonomy/Habitat Requirement3

15-16

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - C R P (E N R) 434 Geographic Information Systems for Landscape Planning

3 - E N R (BIOSC) 413 Restoration Ecology

3 - Conservation Colloquium7

2-3 - Conservation Policy/Law Requirement8

3-4 - Taxonomy/Habitat Requirement3

14-16

Second Semester

3 - E N R 450 Conservation Issues

6-8 - Taxonomy/Habitat Requirement3

3 - Social Sciences Requirement1

3 - Elective

15-17

125-132 Total Semester Hours

1See General Education Requirements.
2GEOG 106, GEOL 101, CSENV 202, or PHYS 240.
3Select from AG M 301, BIOSC 302/306, 303/307, 304/308, 305/309, 320, 406/407, 410/411, 442, 464, 468, 472, 477, CSENV 404, ENT 301, 410, (W F B) 469, FOR 205, 251, 406, GEOL 112, 210, 403, MICRO 403, W F B 418, 440, 462. At least four of the courses must be laboratories or courses with a required laboratory component.
4Select from BIOSC 441, 442, 443, 446, 470.
5AN PH 301, BIOSC 401/402, 458, 475, or (AVS) 480.
6AP EC 433, 475, C R D 357, or FOR 304.
7AP EC 490, BIOSC 491, ENT 490, FOR 419, or W F B 493.
8EN SP 472, FOR 400, 406, LAW 429, or W F B 430.

Notes:
1. Students planning to attend graduate school are strongly encouraged to take organic chemistry after completing CH 101/102.
2. Students planning to attend graduate school are strongly encouraged to substitute MTHSC 106/108 or 106/207 for MTHSC 102 and EX ST 301.
 

NATURAL RESOURCE AND ECONOMIC POLICY CONCENTRATION

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - AP EC 257 Natural Resources, Environment, and Economics

3 - ECON 212 Principles of Macroeconomics

3 - W F B (BIOSC) 313 Conservation Biology or

3 - Minor1
3 - Computer Skills Requirement2

3 - Humanities Requirement E.12

3 - Oral Communication Requirement2

18

Second Semester

3 - C R D 357 Natural Resources Economics

3 - ECON 314 Intermediate Microeconomics

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics

3 - GEOG 103 World Regional Geography

3 - Ecology Requirement3 or

3 - Minor1
3 - Elective

18

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - ECON 319 Environmental Economics

3 - GEOL 300 Environmental Geology

3 - LAW 429 Environmental Law and Policy

2-5 - Ecology Requirement3 or

3 - Minor1
3 - Humanities Requirement E.22

14-17

Second Semester

3 - AP EC 403 Land Economics or

3 - AP EC 420 World Agricultural Trade
3 - AP EC 456 Prices

3 - AP EC 475 Econ. of Wildlife Mgt. and Policy

3 - C R D (AP EC) 412 Spatial Competition and Rural Development

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement2

15

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - AP EC 402 Production Economics

3 - C R D (AP EC) 411 Regional Impact Analysis

3 - ECON 315 Intermediate Macroeconomics

3 - R S (SOC) 401 Human Ecology

3 - Conservation Colloquium4

15

Second Semester

3 - AP EC 452 Agricultural Policy

3 - C R P (E N R) 434 Geographic Information Systems for Landscape Planning or

3 - Minor1
3 - E N R 450 Conservation Issues

7 - Elective or

4 - Elective and

3 - Minor1

16

126-129 Total Semester Hours

1Minor is optional but must be selected from the following: Aquaculture, Fisheries, and Wildlife Biology; Biochemistry; Biological Sciences; Chemistry; Crop and Soil Environmental Science; Environmental Science and Policy; Forest Resource Management; Geography, Geology; Horticulture; Legal Studies; Microbiology; Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management; Urban Forestry. Courses may not be used to fulfill both major and minor requirements.
2See General Education Requirements.
3Select at least three credits from BIOSC 441, CSENV 202, EN SP 200, FOR 206, 315, W F B 350, 412. Remaining credits may be selected from AG M 301, BIOSC 302/306, 303/307, 304/308, 305/309, 320, 406/407, 410/411, 464, 468, 472, 477, CSENV 404, ENT 301, 410, (W F B) 469, FOR 205, 251, MICRO 403, W F B 418, 440.
4AP EC 490, BIOSC 491, ENT 490, FOR 419, or W F B 493.
 

NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - AP EC 257 Natural Resources, Environment, and Economics

4 - CSENV 202 Soils

3 - FOR 205 Dendrology

3 - W F B (BIOSC) 313 Conservation Biology

3 - Computer Skills Requirement1

16

Second Semester

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

3 - FOR 206 Forest Ecology

4 - PHYS 200 Introductory Physics

3 - Humanities Requirement E.21

3 - Literature Requirement2

16

Junior Year

First Semester

4 - BIOSC 320 Field Botany or

3 - BIOSC 406 Intro. Plant Taxonomy and

1 - BIOSC 407 Plant Taxonomy Lab.

3 - C R D 357 Natural Resources Economics

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics

3 - GEOL 101 Physical Geology

1 - GEOL 103 Physical Geology Lab.

3 - Minor3

17

Second Semester

3 - E N R 302 Natural Resources Measurements

3 - ENGL 314 Technical Writing

3 - W F B 350 Principles of Fish and Wildlife Biol.

3 - Minor3

3 - Elective

15

Senior Year

First Semester

2 - FOR (E N R) 416 Forest Policy and Admin.

3 - W F B 462 Wetland Wildlife Biology

3 - Conservation Colloquium4

6 - Minor3

4 - Elective

18

Second Semester

3 - C R P (E N R) 434 Geographic Information Systems for Landscape Planning

3 - E N R 450 Conservation Issues

2 - FOR 406 Forested Watershed Management

3 - LAW 429 Environmental Law and Policy or

3 - FOR 400 Public Relations in Natural Res.

3 - W F B 418 Fishery Conservation

3 - Minor3

17

129 Total Semester Hours

1See General Education Requirements.
2ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
3A minor is required and must be selected from the following: Aquaculture, Fisheries, and Wildlife Biology; Biochemistry; Biological Sciences; Chemistry; Crop and Soil Environmental Science; Environmental Science and Policy; Forest Resource Management; Geology; Horticulture; Legal Studies; Microbiology; Natural Resource Economics; Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management; Urban Forestry. Courses may not be used to fulfill both major and minor requirements.
4AP EC 490, BIOSC 491, ENT 490, FOR 419, or W F B 493.


FOOD SCIENCE

Bachelor of Science

Food Science majors apply principles of basic and applied sciences to the creation, production, processing, evaluation, packaging, distribution, and utilization of safe, nutritious, and enjoyable foods and food products. The safety of foods during processing and preservation, the provision of foods with adequate nutritional value, adherence to dietary recommendations, and the conservation of resources are important consumer issues addressed by food scientists.

The curriculum allows flexibility for concentrating in one of two areas. In the Food Science and Technology concentration, students may emphasize business, engineering, food packaging, additional sciences, or other areas that complement requirements of the Institute of Food Technologists. The Nutrition and Dietetics concentration emphasizes nutrition and related areas. It is currently granted approval status by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education of the American Dietetic Association, 216 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago, IL 60606-6995.

Food processing industries, ingredient manufacturers, and packaging suppliers employ Food Science graduates in food product development, quality assurance, production, management, and business and technical sales. State and federal agencies also need graduates for food safety and regulatory positions. With the Nutrition and Dietetics concentration, employment opportunities include dietitians, nutritionists, consultants, and food specialists. Graduates in Food Science are also well prepared to pursue graduate study in many areas.

Freshman Year

First Semester

4 - BIOL 103 General Biology I or

5 - BIOL 110 Principles of Biology I
4 - CH 101 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

1 - FD SC 101 Epochs in Man's Struggle for Food

3-4 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement1

15-17

Second Semester

4 - BIOL 104 General Biology II or

5 - BIOL 111 Principles of Biology II
4 - CH 102 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

2 - FD SC 102 Perspectives in Food and Nutrition Science

3 - Computer Skills Requirement2

16-17

Sophomore Year

First Semster

4 - CH 201 Survey of Organic Chemistry or

3 - CH 223 Organic Chemistry and

1 - CH 227 Organic Chemistry Lab.

3 - PHYS 122 Physics with Calculus I or
4 - PHYS 200 Introductory Physics or

4 - PHYS 207 General Physics I

3 - Humanities Requirement E.12

3 - Social Science Requirement2

2 - Elective

15-16

Second Semester

3 - BIOCH 210 Elementary Biochemistry

1 - BIOCH 211 Elementary Biochemistry Lab.

4 - FD SC 214 Food Resources and Preservation

3 - Oral Communication Requirement3

3 - Social Science Requirement2

3 - Elective

17
 

FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - FD SC 306 Food Service Operations

3 - FD SC 404 Food Preservation and Processing

2 - FD SC 407 Quantity Food Production

3 - NUTR 451 Human Nutrition

3 - Emphasis Area4

3 - Elective

17

Second Semester

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics

4 - FD SC 408 Food Process Engineering

4 - MICRO 407 Food and Dairy Microbiology

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement5

3-4 - Elective

17-18

Senior Year

First Semester

4 - FD SC 401 Food Chemistry I

1 - FD SC 417 Seminar

4 - MICRO 305 General Microbiology

3 - Humanities Requirement E.22

5 - Emphasis Area4

1 - Elective

18

Second Semester

4 - FD SC 402 Food Chemistry II

3 - FD SC 409 TQM for the Food and Pkg. Ind.

1 - FD SC 418 Seminar

4 - Department Requirement6

4 - Emphasis Area4

16

131-136 Total Semester Hours
 

NUTRITION AND DIETETICS CONCENTRATION

Junior Year

First Semester

4 - BIOSC 222 Human Anatomy and Phys. I

3 - FD SC 306 Food Service Operations

3 - FD SC 404 Food Preservation and Processing

2 - FD SC 407 Quantity Food Production

3 - NUTR 451 Human Nutrition

3 - Humanities Requirement E.22

18

Second Semester

4 - BIOSC 223 Human Anatomy and Phys. II

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics

3 - NUTR 455 Nutrition and Metabolism

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement5

3 - Elective

16

Senior Year

First Semester

4 - FD SC 401 Food Chemistry I

2 - FD SC 491 Practicum

4 - MICRO 305 General Microbiology

4 - NUTR 424 Medical Nutrition Therapy I

2-3 Elective

16-17

Second Semester

4 - FD SC 402 Food Chemistry II

3 - FD SC 409 TQM for the Food and Pkg. Ind.

4 - MICRO 407 Food and Dairy Microbiology

4 - NUTR 425 Medical Nutrition Therapy II

3 - NUTR 426 Community Nutrition

18

131-136 Total Semester Hours

1MTHSC 102 or 106.
2See General Education Requirements.
3COMM 150 or 250.
4See advisor.
5ENGL 304 or 314.
6FD SC 421, 491, or PKGSC 464/466.


FOREST RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Bachelor of Science

The Forest Resource Management curriculum combines a broad education in the arts and sciences with applied forest sciences. This combination provides the necessary foundation for the scientific management of forest resources, products, and services.

Foresters are qualified for a broad spectrum of employment opportunities in the public and private sectors. They may be engaged as managers, administrators, or owners of forest lands or forest-based businesses; as technical specialists in the production of timber, useable water, wildlife, and aesthetic values, and in the recreational use of the forest; or as professionals in other areas where the conservation of natural resources is a concern. Foresters earning advanced degrees find employment in academic work and in research conducted by public and private agencies.

The curriculum, accredited by the Society of American Foresters, provides a strong program in the basic knowledge and skills required of a professional forester. Forest Resource Management majors will select a minor. (See blow.) The curriculum also provides the necessary prerequisites for graduate study. The Department of Forest Resources offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Science, Master of Forest Resources, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees.

Freshman Year

First Semester

4 - BIOL 103 General Biology I

4 - CH 105 Beg. General and Organic Chemistry1

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

1 - FOR 101 Introduction to Forestry

3 - MTHSC 102 Intro. to Mathematical Analysis

15

Second Semester

4 - BIOL 104 General Biology II2

3 - CP SC 120 Intro. to Information Technology

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - FOR 221 Wood Properties I

3 - Elective

16

Sophomore Year

First Semester

4 - CSENV 202 Soils

3 - FOR 205 Dendrology

3 - Literature Requirement3

3 - Social Science Requirement4

3 - Elective

16

Second Semester

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

3 - FOR 206 Forestry Ecology

4 - PHYS 200 Introductory Physics

3 - Economics Requirement5

3 - Humanities Requirement E.24

16

Forestry Summer Camp

2 - FOR 251 Forest Communities

4 - FOR 253 Forest Mensuration

1 - FOR 254 Forest Products

7

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics6

3 - FOR 302 Forest Biometrics

3 - FOR 304 Forest Resource Economics

4 - FOR 413 Integrated Forest Pest Management

3 - FOR 460 Silviculture I

3 - Minor7

19

Second Semester

3 - ENGL 314 Technical Writing

2 - FOR 308 Remote Sensing and GIS in Forestry

3 - FOR 418 Forest Resource Valuation

3 - FOR 462 Silviculture II

3 - Minor7

4 - Elective

18

Senior Year

First Semester

4 - FOR 314 Harvesting and Forestry Products

2 - FOR (E N R) 416 Forest Policy and Admin.

3 - FOR 417 Forest Res. Mgt. and Regulation

6 - Minor7

15

Second Semester

2 - FOR 406 Forest Watershed Management

3 - FOR 415 Forest Wildlife Management

2 - FOR 423 Current Issues in Natural Resources

2 - FOR 425 Forest Resource Management Plans

2 - FOR 431 Rec. Resource Plan. in Forest Mgt.

3 - Minor7

14

136 Total Semester Hours

1CH 101 may be substituted.
2May be satisfied by CH 102 (if CH 101 is taken) or 106 (if CH 105 is taken).
3ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
4See General Education Requirements.
5Select ECON course from General Education Requirement F.
6MTHSC 203, 301, or equivalent may be substituted.
7To be selected by the end of the sophomore year.


HORTICULTURE

Bachelor of Science

Horticulture is the art, science, and business of food crops, ornamental plants, and turfgrasses and their production, utilization, and maintenance. A strong foundation in the basic sciences and humanities is built on courses in mathematics, chemistry, botany, physics, computer science, communications, economics, and humanities. Horticulture as a science depends on disciplines such as plant pathology, plant physiology, entomology, forestry, agronomy, soils, agricultural engineering, and agricultural economics. Business courses contribute to a well-rounded curriculum. A growing aspect of horticulture involves the management of enterprises, from production to distribution and marketing. Horticulture as an art involves the arrangement of plants in an aesthetically pleasing fashion.

Students begin professional development as undergraduates. An internship in a horticultural enterprise is strongly recommended. Students considering graduate school are advised to take optional courses in the basic sciences as well as conduct an undergraduate research project. Those with strong interests in specific disciplines may complete special problems under the supervision of a faculty member.

Freshman Year

First Semester

4 - BIOL 103 General Biology I

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - HORT 101 Horticulture

3 - MTHSC 102 Intro. to Mathematical Analysis

3 - Computer Skills Requirement1

16

Second Semester

3 - BIOSC 205 Plant Form and Function

1 - BIOSC 206 Plant Form and Function Lab.

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics or

3 - MTHSC 101 Introduction to Probability

3 - Humanities Requirement E.21

3 - Social Science Requirement1

16

Sophomore Year

First Semester

4 - CH 101 General Chemistry

3 - HORT 303 Plant Materials

3 - Business Requirement2

3 - Oral Communication Requirement1

3 - Social Science Requirement1

16

Second Semester

4 - CH 102 General Chemistry

3 - HORT 304 Annuals and Perennials

3 - HORT 305 Plant Propagation

1 - HORT 306 Plant Propagation Techniques Lab

3 - Humanities Requirement E.11

14

Summer

3 - HORT 271 Internship3 or
3 - HORT 471 Advanced Internship3

Junior Year

First Semester

4 - CSENV 202 Soils

3 - Business Requirement2

3 - Life Science Requirement2

3 - Physical Science Requirement2

3 - Plant Protection Requirement2

16

Second Semester

3 - BIOSC 401 Plant Physiology

1 - BIOSC 402 Plant Physiology Lab.

1 - HORT 409 Seminar

3 - Horticulture Specialization Requirement2

4 - Physical Science Requirement2

3 - Plant Protection Requirement2

15

Senior Year

First Semester

6 - Horticulture Specialization Requirement2

3 - Life Science Requirement2

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement1

4 - Elective

16

Second Semester

3 - Departmental Requirement2

6 - Horticulture Specialization Requirement2

6 - Elective

15

127 Total Semester Hours

1See General Education Requirements.
2See advisor. Select from approved departmental list.
3Internship must be completed in one or two semesters. Internship may be done fall, spring, or summer after completing HORT 303. Prior approval is required, and a 2.0 grade-point ratio is required for registration.


MICROBIOLOGY

Bachelor of Science

Microbiology deals with the study of bacteria, viruses, yeasts, filamentous fungi, protozoa, and unicellular algae. Microbiologists seek to describe these organisms in terms of their structures, functions, and processes of reproduction, growth, and death at both the cellular and molecular levels. They are also concerned with their ecology, particularly in regard to their pathological effects on man, and with their economic importance.

The Microbiology major provides a thorough training in the basic microbiological skills. Further, students receive instruction in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biochemistry, all essential to the training of a modern microbiologist. Students can prepare for a variety of careers through a wide choice of electives. The Microbiology curriculum with Molecular Biology Concentration is recommended for students planning postgraduate programs. Microbiology graduates may enter graduate school in microbiology, biochemistry, bioengineering, or related disciplines; they may enter a medical or dental school or pursue a career in one of the many industries or public service departments dependent upon microbiology. Some of these are the fermentation and drug industries, medical and public health microbiology, various food industries, and agriculture.

Microbiology majors planning to apply for admission to a medical or dental school should inform their advisors immediately upon entering the program.

Freshman Year

First Semester

5 - BIOL 110 Principles of Biology I1

4 - CH 101 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

4 - MTHSC 106 Calculus of One Variable I

16

Second Semester

5 - BIOL 111 Principles of Biology II1

4 - CH 102 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

1 - MICRO 100 Microbes and Human Affairs

3-4 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement2

16-17

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - CH 223 Organic Chemistry

1 - CH 227 Organic Chemistry Lab.

3 - CP SC 120 Intro. to Information Technology

4 - MICRO 305 General Microbiology

3 - Literature Requirement3

3 - Social Science Requirement4

17

Second Semester

3 - BIOCH 301 General Biochemistry

3 - CH 224 Organic Chemistry

1 - CH 228 Organic Chemistry Lab.

3 - Approved Requirement5

3 - Literature Requirement3

4-3 - Mathematical Sciences or

Science Requirement6
17-16

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

4 - MICRO 401 Advanced Bacteriology

4-3 - Physics Requirement7

6-7 - Elective

17

Second Semester

4 - MICRO 412 Bacterial Physiology

4 - MICRO 415 Microbial Genetics

4 - Physics Requirement7

3 - Social Science Requirement4

3-4 - Elective

18-19

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - ENGL 314 Technical Writing

14-13 - Approved Requirement5

17-16

Second Semester

4 - MICRO 411 Pathogenic Bacteriology

12 - Approved Requirement5

16

134 Total Semester Hours

1BIOL 103 may substitute for BIOL 110, and BIOL 104 may substitute for BIOL 111; the remaining 1-2 hours required must be satisfied by completing 1-2 extra hours in either biological sciences or microbiology.
2Select from MTHSC 108, 301, or EX ST 301. MTHSC 108 is required for MicrobiologyMolecular Biology majors.
3ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
4See General Education Requirements.
5A minimum of 15 credits must be selected from AVS 458, BIOSC 403, 404, 425, 426, 456/457, MICRO 400, 403, 407, 410, 413, (AVS, BIOSC) 414, 416, 417, 491 (six credits maximum with advisor's approval).
6Select from GEOL 101 or any science course at the sophomore level or above, excluding microbiology, with advisor's approval.
7Select from PHYS 207/208 or 122/221/223.
 

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY CONCENTRATION

See Microbiology curriculum for Freshman year.

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - CH 223 Organic Chemistry

1 - CH 227 Organic Chemistry Lab.

3 - CP SC 120 Intro. to Information Technology

4 - MICRO 305 General Microbiology

3 - Literature Requirement1

3 - Social Science Requirement2

17

Second Semester

3 - BIOCH 301 General Biochemistry

3 - CH 224 Organic Chemistry

1 - CH 228 Organic Chemistry Lab.

3 - Literature Requirement1

3 - Microbiology Requirement3

3 - Social Science Requirement2

16

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - CH 313 Quantitative Analysis

1 - CH 317 Quantitative Analysis Lab.

4 - MICRO 401 Advanced Bacteriology

3 - MICRO (AVS, BIOSC) 414 Basic Immunology

4-3 - Physics Requirement4

2-3 - Elective

17

Second Semester

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

4 - MICRO 412 Bacterial Physiology

3 - MICRO 417 Molecular Mechanisms of Carcinogenesis and Aging

4 - Physics Requirement4

3 - Elective

17

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - BIOCH 423 Principles of Biochemistry

3 - ENGL 314 Technical Writing

4 - MICRO 415 Microbial Genetics

3 - MICRO 416 Introductory Virology

3 - Elective

16

Second Semester

3 - BIOCH 432 Biochemistry of Metabolism

4 - MICRO 411 Pathogenic Bacteriology

3 - MICRO 491 Special Problems in Microbiology

8 - Elective

18

134 Total Semester Hours

1ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
2See General Education Requirements.
3AVS 458, BIOSC 403, 404, 425, 426, 456/457, MICRO 400, 403, 407, 410, or 413.
4Select from PHYS 207/208 or 122/221/223.


PACKAGING SCIENCE

Bachelor of Science

The Bachelor of Science degree in Packaging Science prepares students for careers in industries producing and utilizing packages for all types of products. Packaging is an essential part of industrialized economies, protecting, preserving, and helping to market products. The field of packaging is highly competitive and highly innovative, requiring an ever-increasing number of professional positions.

Opportunities for employment include a wide variety of career paths such as manufacturing, marketing, sales, design, purchasing, quality assurance, and customer services. Most career opportunities are in positions requiring technical knowledge combined with marketing and management skills.

The core curriculum assures graduates of having the skills and knowledge required by most entry-level packaging positions. Emphasis area choices allow students to select courses to improve career preparation for specific industry segments. The food packaging emphasis area prepares students for this technically challenging field; the general packaging emphasis area allows students to concentrate in other specialty areas, such as environmental science or graphic communications.

Students changing majors to Packaging Science must have at least a 2.0 cumulative grade-point ratio.

Freshman Year

First Semester

4 - BIOL 103 General Biology I

4 - CH 101 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

1 - PKGSC 101 Packaging Orientation1

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement2

15

Second Semester

4 - BIOL 104 General Biology II

4 - CH 102 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

4 - MTHSC 106 Calculus of One Variable I

2 - PKGSC 102 Intro. to Packaging Science1

1 - Elective

18

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - CH 223 Organic Chemistry

1 - CH 227 Organic Chemistry Lab.

3 - CP SC 120 Intro. to Information Technology

4 - PHYS 207 General Physics I3

4 - PKGSC 202 Packaging Materials and Manuf.1

3 - THRD 180 Introduction to Technical Drawing and Computer-Aided Drafting

18

Second Semester

4 - FD SC 214 Food Resources and Preservation

4 - G C 104 Graphic Communications I

3 - PKGSC 204 Container Systems1

1 - PKGSC 206 Container Systems Lab.

3 - Emphasis Area2

3 - Humanities Requirement E.14

18

Summer

0 - CO-OP 101 Cooperative Education5

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - COMM 250 Public Speaking

3 - PKGSC 368 Packaging and Society

3 - PKGSC 404 Mechanical Properties of Packages and Principles of Package Evaluation

2 - PKGSC 454 Package Evaluation Lab.

3 - Emphasis Area2

3 - Social Science Requirement6

17

Second Semester

3 - ENGL 314 Technical Writing

4 - MICRO 305 General Microbiology

3 - PKGSC 401 Packaging Machinery

3 - PKGSC 440 Packaging for Distribution

3 - Emphasis Area2

16

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics

3 - PKGSC 464 Food Packaging Systems

1 - PKGSC 466 Food Packaging Systems Lab.

3 - Emphasis Area2

3 - Humanities Requirement E.24

3 - Social Science Requirement6

16

Second Semester

3 - PKGSC 416 Appl. of Polymers in Packaging

3 - PKGSC 420 Package Design and Development

3 - Emphasis Area2

9 - Elective

18

136 Total Semester Hours

1A C or better is required in this course for graduation.
2See advisor.
3PHYS 122 and 124 may be substituted.
4See General Education Requirements.
5Students are required to complete at least one 15-week period (six months preferred) of Cooperative Education.
6AP EC 202 or ECON 211, and three credits selected from HIST 101, 102, 172, 173, PO SC 101, PSYCH 201, R S (SOC) 401; SOC 201, GEOG 101, 103.


PREPROFESSIONAL HEALTH STUDIES

Non-degree

The health professions need individuals with a diversity of educational backgrounds and a wide variety of talents and interests. The philosophies of education, the specific preprofessional course requirements, the noncognitive qualifications for enrollment, and the systems of training vary among the professional health schools; but all recognize the desirability of a broad educationa good foundation in the natural sciences, highly developed communication skills, and a solid background in the humanities and social sciences. The absolute requirements for admission to professional health schools are limited to allow latitude for developing individualized undergraduate programs of study; however, most schools of medicine and dentistry require 16 semester hours of chemistry, including organic chemistry, eight hours of biological sciences, eight hours of physics, and at least one course in calculus. These requirements should be balanced with courses in vocabulary building, the humanities, and social sciences. The basic requirements in the natural sciences and as many of the courses in the humanities and social sciences as possible should be completed by the third year so that students will be prepared to take the Dental Admission Test or the Medical College Admission Test prior to applying to a professional school.

Undergraduates may also prepare to study optometry, podiatry, and other health professions. While the basic requirements for these professional schools are essentially the same as those for schools of medicine and dentistry, specific requirements for individual schools in these professions vary somewhat; consequently, interested students are advised to consult with the chief health professionals advisor.

At Clemson, rather than having a separate, organized preprofessional health study program, students are allowed to major in any curriculum, as long as the basic entrance requirements of the professional health school are fulfilled. These schools are not as concerned about a student's major as they are about academic performance whichever curriculum the student chooses. Professional health schools have neither preferences nor prejudices concerning any curriculum, which is evidenced by the fact that their entering students represent a broad spectrum of curricula. The emphasis is placed on the student's doing well in the curriculum chosen, and this becomes critical as competition increases for the limited number of places available in professional health schools.


PREPHARMACY

Prepharmacy is a two-year program requiring a minimum of 68 semester hours. Upon completion of the curriculum, students will be eligible to apply to a college of pharmacy, usually the Medical University of South Carolina or the University of South Carolina. The degree in Pharmacy is awarded by the institution attended. It is important for students to work closely with their advisor as there are variations in courses required by the pharmacy schools.

For financial aid purposes, students in the Prephar-macy program are considered to be enrolled in a degree-seeking program.

First Year

First Semester

4 - BIOL 103 General Biology I

4 - CH 101 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - MTHSC 101 Introduction to Probability1 or

3 - HIST 365 English Cultural History2
3 - PSYCH 201 Introduction to Psychology

17

Second Semester

4 - BIOL 104 General Biology II

4 - CH 102 General Chemistry

3 - ECON 200 Economic Concepts

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

4 - MTHSC 106 Calculus of One Variable I or

3 - MTHSC 102 Intro. to Math. Analysis
17-18

Second Year

First Semester

3 - CH 223 Organic Chemistry

1 - CH 227 Organic Chemistry Lab.

4 - MICRO 305 General Microbiology or

3-4 - Physiology Requirement3
4 - PHYS 207 General Physics I

3 - Fine Arts Requirement4

4 - Foreign Language Requirement or

3 - Liberal Arts Requirement5
17-19

Second Semester

3 - CH 224 Organic Chemistry

1 - CH 228 Organic Chemistry Lab.

3 - COMM 150 Intro. to Speech Communication

3 - MTHSC 301 Stat. Theory and Methods I or

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics
4 - PHYS 208 General Physics II

4 - Foreign Language Requirement or

3 - Liberal Arts Requirement5
17-18

68-72 Total Semester Hours

1Chemistry requires proficiency in algebra; physics requires proficiency in trigonometry. Entering freshmen must present a satisfactory score on the Clemson Mathematics Placement Test or register in the first semester in MTHSC 103.
2The Medical University of South Carolina requires a math course. The University of South Carolina requires a history course. To be eligible for both professional schools, the course not taken this semester must be taken during a summer term.
3The Medical University of South Carolina requires MICRO 305. The University of South Carolina requires a physiology course. To be eligible for both professional schools, the course not taken this semester must be taken during a summer term.
4See advisor.
5The University of South Carolina requires credit for two semesters of a foreign language or exemption by examination. Students exempting the foreign language must take a liberal arts requirement. Either the foreign language or the liberal arts requirement meets the Medical University of South Carolina requirement.


PREREHABILITATION SCIENCES

Prerehabilitation Sciences includes concentrations in physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistant, and allied health areas. This curriculum is designed to meet the requirements of the rehabilitation medicine programs at the Medical University of South Carolina and other professional schools. This program requires a minimum of 68-90 semester hours of undergraduate coursework depending on the concentration. In addition, students must apply to a professional school for acceptance into its program.

Because preparation of some of the concentrations requires three years, students are advised to select a major with similar requirements after consultation with the Prerehabilitation Sciences advisor. The following curriculum fulfills the general requirements for those fields, requiring only two years of prerequisites. The Prephysical Therapy and Preoccupational Therapy concentrations require an additional year of electives. These electives should be chosen after consultation with the advisor. Professional schools may change their requirements at any time, so it is imperative that students in this major stay in close contact with their advisor.

For financial aid purposes, students in the Prerehabili-tation Sciences program are considered to be enrolled in a degree-seeking program.

First Year

First Semester

4 - BIOL 103 General Biology I

4 - CH 101 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - PSYCH 201 Introduction to Psychology

3-4 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement1

17-18

Second Semester

4 - BIOL 104 General Biology II

4 - CH 102 General Chemistry

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - Humanities Requirement2

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement1

17

Second Year

First Semester

4 - BIOSC 222 Human Anatomy and Phys. I

4 - PHYS 207 General Physics I

3 - PSYCH 340 Lifespan Developmental Psych.

3 - Humanities Requirement2

3 - Literature Requirement3

17

Second Semester

4 - BIOSC 223 Human Anatomy and Phys. II

3 - COMM 150 Intro. to Speech Communication

3 - CP SC 120 Intro. to Information Technology

3 - HIST 365 English Cultural History

4 - PHYS 208 General Physics II

17

Third Year4

68-90 Total Semester Hours

1See advisor. Two courses selected from MTHSC 102 or 106 and EX ST 301 or MTHSC 301. To register for MTHSC 102 or 106, entering students must present a satisfactory score on the Clemson Mathematics Placement Test or register in the first semester for MTHSC 103.
2See General Education Requirements.
3ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
4Currently only the Prephysical Therapy and Preoccupational Therapy concentrations require a third year. Although any credit course may satisfy the requirements for the third year, students are advised to select courses in consultation with the advisor to satisfy General Education Requirements.


PREVETERINARY MEDICINE

Under a regional plan, the South Carolina Prevet-erinary Advisory Committee coordinates a program for South Carolina residents who are interested in pursuing careers in veterinary medicine. South Carolina residents attending any college or university may apply through the Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS) to the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine. Currently the University of Georgia admits up to 17 students each year through arrangements with the Southern Regional Education Board. The State of South Carolina also has a contract with Tuskegee University to admit up to four South Carolina residents. Application must be made directly to Tuskegee University.

Minimum requirements for admission to a college of veterinary medicine generally include the satisfactory completion of prescribed courses in a well-rounded undergraduate degree program. Specific requirements for admission to the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine include the following undergraduate courses: six credits of English, 14 credits of humanities and social studies, eight of physics, eight of general biology, eight credits of advanced biology, three credits of biochemistry and 16 credits of organic and inorganic chemistry. (Chemistry and physics courses must be at the premedical level; they may not be survey courses.)

To be in the best competitive position, applicants should complete courses in animal agriculture, genetics, nutrition, biochemistry, and advanced biology. Considerations for selection are character, scholastic achievement, personality, experience with large and small animals, general knowledge, and motivation. In the past, competition has been keen, and only those applicants who have shown exceptional ability have been admitted. Specific considerations may include a minimal grade-point average and completion of standardized tests such as the Graduate Record Examination and the Veterinary College Admission Test.

Since out-of-state students attending Clemson are ineligible to apply to the University of Georgia or Tuskegee University under the South Carolina quota, they should contact the college(s) of veterinary medicine to which they plan to apply. They may apply at the University of Georgia for at-large admission.

Veterinary schools accept students with a broad range of academic backgrounds; therefore, it is recommended that the beginning university student select any undergraduate major and simultaneously complete the courses required for veterinary school entrance and those required for completion of a BS or BA degree. For students selecting Animal and Veterinary Sciences or Biological Sciences at Clemson University, the basic curricula have been designed to accommodate Georgia's entrance requirements. Further information is available from the Department of Animal and Veterinary Sciences at 864-656-3427.


TURFGRASS

Bachelor of Science

The Turfgrass program, for students interested in careers in the rapidly growing turfgrass industry, specifies courses in turfgrass management, pathology of turf and ornamental plants, agricultural mechanization, personnel management, soil fertility, soil microbiology, weed control, and park and recreation management. Graduates pursue careers in professional lawn care; maintenance of parks, athletic fields, and golf courses; production and sale of seed, sod, supplies, and equipment; or technicians for businesses or government agencies.

Freshman Year

First Semester

4 - BIOL 103 General Biology I

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - HORT 101 Horticulture

3 - MTHSC 102 Intro. to Mathematical Analysis

3 - Computer Skills Requirement1

16

Second Semester

3 - BIOSC 205 Plant Form and Function

1 - BIOSC 206 Plant Form and Function Lab.

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics or

3 - MTHSC 101 Introduction to Probability
3 - Humanities Requirement E.21

3 - Social Science Requirement1

16

Sophomore Year

First Semester

4 - CH 101 General Chemistry

3 - HORT 212 Introduction to Turfgrass Culture

1 - HORT 213 Turfgrass Culture Lab.

3 - HORT 303 Plant Materials

3 - Oral Communication Requirement1

14

Second Semester

4 - CH 102 General Chemistry

3 - Business Requirement2

3 - Humanities Requirement E.11

3 - Social Science Requirement1

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement1

16

Summer

3 - HORT 271 Internship3 or
3 - HORT 471 Advanced Internship3

Junior Year

First Semester

4 - CSENV 202 Soils

3 - Physical Science Requirement2

3 - Plant Protection Requirement2

4 - Elective

14

Second Semester

3 - BIOSC 401 Plant Physiology

1 - BIOSC 402 Plant Physiology Lab.

3 - Business Requirement2

3 - Life Science Requirement2

4 - Physical Science Requirement2

3 - Plant Protection Requirement2

17

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - HORT 412 Turfgrass Management

6 - Horticulture Specialization Requirement2

4 - Life Science Requirement2

3 - Soils Requirement2

16

Second Semester

3 - HORT 420 Contemporary Issues in Turfgrass Science and Management

3 - Horticulture Specialization Requirement2

3 - Soils Requirement2

6 - Elective

15

127 Total Semester Hours

1See General Education Requirements.
2See advisor.
3Internship must be completed in one or two semesters. Internship may be done fall, spring, or summer after completing HORT 212/213. Prior approval is required, and a 2.0 grade-point ratio is required for registration.


MINORS

Following are minors acceptable for students in the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences. Students cannot major and minor in the same field or acquire a minor that is not allowed by the degree program.

Accounting

Adult/Extension Education

Aerospace Studies

African American Studies

Agricultural Business Management

Agricultural Mechanization and Business

Anthropology

Aquaculture, Fisheries, and Wildlife Biology

Beef Cattle Production--not open to Animal and Veterinary Sciencesmajors

Biochemistry

Bioengineering

Biological Sciences

Business Administration

Chemistry

Cluster

Communication Studies

Communications

Computer Science

Crop and Soil Environmental Science

Early Interventionist

East Asian Studies

Economics

Education

English

Entomology

Entrepreneurship

Environmental Engineering

Environmental Science and Policy

Film Studies

Financial Management

Fine Arts

Food Science

Forest Products

Forest Resource Management

Geography

Geology

Great Works

Health Science

History

Horse Production--not open to Animal and Veterinary Sciences majors

Horticulture--not open to Turfgrass majors

Human Resource Management

International Politics

Legal Studies

Management

Mathematical Sciences

Microbiology

Military Leadership

Modern Languages

Music

Natural Resource Economics

Operations Management

Packaging Science

Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management

Philosophy

Physics

Political Science

Poultry Science--not open to Animal and Veterinary Sciences majors

Psychology

Public Policy

Religion

Science and Technology in Society

Screenwriting

Sociology

Spanish-American Area Studies

Textiles

Theatre

Turfgrass--not open to Horticulture majors

Urban Forestry

Women's Studies

Writing

See minors for details.