COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE, ARTS, AND HUMANITIES



The collaboration of Architecture (Landscape Architecture, Construction Science and Management, City and Regional Planning, and Architecture) with Arts (Visual Arts and Performing Arts) and the Humanities (English, History, Languages, Philosophy and Religion, and Speech and Communication Studies) produces a remarkably rich environment for study. The mixture of core disciplines with applied professsions/disciplines in the College provides both depth and breadth in learning. This structure affords students and faculty with skills that address the complex and interconnected challenges of the future, where it is no longer possible for these problems to be solved in a single discipline or profession. It is through the connections and communication between specialized knowledge areas that significant cultural progress will be made. These kinds of thoughts and actions form a fundamental part of the College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities.

To illustrate these ideas, consider the diversity of communication skills practiced and taught in the College. Students learn graphic and artistic communication, technical communication with computers, spoken communication, and communication through the written word. Each skill is vital to a successful student, and it is the collaboration between these forms of communication that prepares students for the complex challenges of the future.

SCHOOL OF DESIGN AND BUILDING AND SCHOOL OF THE ARTS

The Bachelor of Arts in Architecture degree is the preprofessional preparation for two years of graduate study leading to the Master of Architecture degree, which is the fully accredited professional degree in the field. The accredited Bachelor of Science in Construction Science and Management program prepares students for careers as professional managers in the construction industry. A graduate program is also offered leading to the Master of Construction Science and Management. The Visual Arts program offers professional study in the studio visual arts leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. A graduate program leading to the Master of Fine Arts is also offered. The accredited five-year Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree program prepares students for careers as professional landscape architects. The Bachelor of Arts in Production Studies in Performing Arts is a distinctive degree program that combines practical hands-on experiences in performing arts production technologies with classes in music and theatre performance, history, and theory. A graduate program in City and Regional Planning is housed within the school and accepts graduates from a variety of baccalaureate programs and prepares them for careers in both public and private sector planning through its Master of City and Regional Planning degree.

In addition to the facilities housed on the Clemson campus, the College offers students the opportunity to study at two off-campus sites. The center at the College of Charleston is available to third- and fourth-year architecture and fourth-year landscape architecture students for a semester's study while earning credit from both Clemson University and the College of Charleston. The Charles E. Daniel Center for Building Research and Urban Studies in Genoa, Italy, provides graduate students and upper division undergraduates in the above mentioned programs a semester's residence in an intensive program of study and travel while earning full credit toward their degrees.

Entrance Requirements

Admission to degree programs in the School of Design and Building and the School of the Arts is based on academic performance and is limited based on space availability in the various programs. Students seeking admission are advised to apply to the Admissions Office early in the fall of their senior year in high school. They are also encouraged to visit the school during their senior year. Faculty are available to meet with them and their parents informally and answer questions and discuss individual programs in more detail. Prospective students may schedule appointments by calling the individual department.

Change of Major

When space is available, a student may change majors to one of the degree programs in the School of Design and Building with a 2.5 cumulative grade-point ratio, at least 30 credit hours earned, and design aptitude evidenced by a portfolio review (in the case of the Architecture discipline) or by approval of the department chair.

Advancement in Architecture

Students enrolled in second-, third-, or fourth-year design studios and theory courses must attain at least a 2.0 grade-point ratio in each year level (by repeating one or both semesters, if necessary) to qualify for advancement to the next year level or in the case of fourth-year Architecture studios, to qualify for the Architecture degree, or in Landscape Architecture at the fifth year to qualify for the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree.

SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES

The Bachelor of Arts degree is offered in English, History, Language and International Trade, Modern Languages, Philosophy, and Speech and Communication Studies.

To achieve depth as well as breadth in their educational experiences, students majoring in English, History, Modern Languages, Philosophy, or Speech and Communication Studies complete at least 24 semester hours from courses above the sophomore level. As soon as feasible and not later than the end of the sophomore year, students in these fields also select a minor, consisting of at least 15 additional semester hours. Courses satisfying the major may not also be included in the minor. A second major (a double major) may substitute for the minor, provided all requirements are fulfilled for each major.

The Bachelor of Arts in English, History, Modern Languages, Philosophy, and Speech and Communication Studies requires 130 total semester credits; Language and International Trade requires 129-137, depending on the concentration. Of these, at least 12 credits must be earned in humanities courses numbered 300 or higher (A A H 210, MUSIC 210 and THEA 210 excepted). All majors in the School of Humanities (with the exception of English majors) must earn 12 credits in social science courses numbered 300 or higher. English majors must earn at least six credits in this category. The humanities for this purpose are considered to include art and architectural history, English (except 304, 312, 314, 316, 331, 333, 334, 335, 485, 490, 495), languages, music, philosophy, religion, speech (except 362 and 364), theatre (except 377, 487, and 497), and women's studies, as well as courses entitled humanities. The social sciences for this purpose are considered to include agricultural and applied economics, anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. The foreign language requirement in humanities is a proficiency requirement. Students must complete through 202 in Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, or Spanish.

Students enrolled in degree programs offered in the humanities who expect to teach in the public schools may elect education courses required for teaching certificates by the South Carolina State Department of Education. Such courses are to be approved by their own department advisors.

Students may transfer into the Undeclared category in the Humanities only if they have completed 45 or fewer credit hours.


ARCHITECTURE

Bachelor of Arts

Architects have a creative responsibility of designing the buildings which shape our physical environment. To understand the humanistic, economic, and technological nature of environmental problems, students must have a sound general education. Subsequent professional education must be preparation for a life of continuing change in which the problems to be solved will be large and small, for every sort of function, in every type of climate, and for every condition of budget.

Architectural Registration/Licensure

Most states require that an individual intending to become an architect hold an accredited degree. There are two types of degrees that are accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board: (1) the Bachelor of Architecture, which requires a minimum of five years of study, and (2) the Master of Architecture, which requires a minimum of three years of study following an unrelated bachelor's degree or two years following a related preprofes-sional bachelor's degree. The professional degrees are structured to educate those who aspire to registration/licensure as architects.

The four-year preprofessional degree, where offered, is not accredited by NAAB; it is useful for those wishing a foundation in the field of architecture, as preparation for either continued education in a professional degree program, or for employment options in architecturally related areas.

Freshman Year

First Semester

4 - ARCH 151 Collaborative Studio I

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - HIST 172 Western Civilization

4 - MTHSC 106 Calculus of One Variable I

4 - Foreign Language Requirement

18

Second Semester

3 - ARCH 152 Collaborative Studio II

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - HIST 173 Western Civilization

3 - MTHSC 301 Stat. Theory and Methods I

4 - Foreign Language Requirement

1 - Elective

17

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - A A H 101 Survey of Art and Arch. History I

4 - ARCH 251 Collaborative Studio III

3 - ENGL 207 Survey of World Literature I

4 - PHYS 207 General Physics I

3 - Foreign Language Requirement

17

Second Semester

3 - A A H 102 Survey of Art and Arch. History II

4 - ARCH 252 Collaborative Studio IV

3 - ENGL 208 Survey of World Literature II

4 - PHYS 208 General Physics II

3 - Foreign Language Requirement

17

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - A A H 203 History and Theory of Arch. I

6 - ARCH 351 Architecture Studio I

3 - C S M 201 Structures I

3 - C S M 203 Materials and Methods of Const. I

3 - Minor

18

Second Semester

3 - A A H 204 History and Theory of Arch. II

6 - ARCH 352 Architecture Studio II

3 - C S M 202 Structures II

3 - C S M 205 Materials and Meth. of Const. II

3 - Minor

18

Senior Year

First Semester

6 - ARCH 451 Architecture Studio III

3 - C S M 304 Environmental Systems I

3 - Humanities Seminar1

3 - Minor

3 - Elective

18

Second Semester

6 - ARCH 452 Architecture Studio IV

6 - Minor

6 - Elective

18

141 Total Semester Hours

1See advisor.


CONSTRUCTION SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT

Bachelor of Science

As the largest single industry in the United States and one of the most important, construction offers unlimited opportunities to highly motivated and professionally educated men and women. Future professionals must be skilled in managing people, equipment, and capital, coupled with a grasp of construction materials and methods and the complex technologies of modern construction. The Bachelor of Science in Construction Science and Management curriculum is the basis for a career in construction or as a developer or building management specialist.

Freshman Year

First Semester

3 - A A H 210 Intro. to Art and Architecture

3 - ARCH 201 Introduction to Architecture

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

4 - MTHSC 106 Calculus of One Variable I1

4 - PHYS 207 General Physics I

17

Second Semester

3 - C S M 100 Introduction to Construction Science and Management

3 - CP SC 120 Intro. to Information Technology

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - MTHSC 301 Stat. Theory and Methods I1

4 - PHYS 208 General Physics II

16

Sophomore Year

First Semester

2 - B E 221 Surveying for Soil and Water Res.

3 - C S M 201 Structures I

3 - C S M 203 Materials and Methods of Const. I

3 - ECON 211 Principles of Microeconomics

3 - Literature Requirement2

3 - Elective

17

Second Semester

3 - ACCT 201 Financial Accounting Concepts

3 - C S M 202 Structures II

3 - C S M 204 Contract Documents

3 - C S M 205 Materials and Methods of Const. II

3 - ECON 212 Principles of Macroeconomics

3 - SPCH 150 Intro. to Speech Communication or

3 - SPCH 250 Public Speaking

18

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - C S M 301 Structures III

3 - C S M 303 Soils and Foundations

3 - C S M 304 Environmental Systems I

3 - C S M 351 Construction Estimating

3 - ENGL 304 Business Writing or

3 - ENGL 314 Technical Writing
3 - Elective

18

Second Semester

3 - C S M 305 Environmental Systems II

3 - C S M 352 Construction Scheduling

3 - C S M 353 Construction Estimating II

3 - LAW 322 Legal Environment of Business

3 - MGT 307 Personnel Management

3 - Elective

18

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - C S M 411 Safety in Building Construction

3 - C S M 453 Construction Project Management

3 - C S M 461 Construction Economics Seminar

6 - Major Requirement3

15

Second Semester

6 - C S M 454 Construction Capstone

0 - C S M 491 CSM Internship and Examination

6 - Major Requirement3

3 - Elective

15

134 Total Semester Hours

1The sequence MTHSC 101, 102, and 203 may be substituted.
2ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
3Select from approved departmental list or as approved in writing by advisor and department chair. Note: Six credit hours must be in business.

Notes:
1. ENGL 101 and 102 must be completed in the freshman year.
2. A minimum of 800 hours of construction experience will be required prior to graduation.


ENGLISH

Bachelor of Arts

The purposes of a major in English are to help students acquire an understanding of our literary heritage; develop an appreciation and practical knowledge of the modes of literary expression, research, and criticism; improve the ability to write effectively and intelligently; gain insights into literature as a humane study; and prepare for advanced work in English language, literature, and related disciplines.

The program of study consists of courses stipulated in the map below,* which includes 31 semester hours of English, arranged as follows:

Group I--Seven credits from ENGL 190, 310, and 411 or 412.

Group II--Three credits from ENGL 405, 407, 408, 409, 410, 412, 413, 414.

Group III--Three credits from ENGL 406, 415, 416, 417, 418.

Group IV--Three credits from ENGL 422, 423, 424, 425.

Group V--Three credits from ENGL 400, 401, 435, 436, 440, (SPCH) 491, (SPCH) 492.

Group VI--Three credits from ENGL 335, 380, (ENGL) 456, 482, 483.

Group VII--Three credits from ENGL 312, 331, 345, 346, 348

Group VIII--Six additional credits from 300- and 400-level courses, at least three credits from the 400 level.

Three 400-level credits must be from the depart-ment's variable list of "Senior Seminar" offerings.

Proficiency in composition is required of all English majors and minors. English majors and minors with writing problems must overcome them in the Writing Laboratory.

Electives are added as necessary to meet the minimum number of 130 hours required for graduation.

*No course may be used to satisfy both major and minor requirements.

Freshman Year

First Semester

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - HIST 172 Western Civilization

4 - Foreign Language Requirement1

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement2

4 - Science Requirement3

17

Second Semester

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - HIST 173 Western Civilization

4 - Foreign Language Requirement1

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement2

4 - Science Requirement3

17

Sophomore Year

First Semester

1 - ENGL 190 The Study of English

3 - Computer Skills Requirement4

3 - Fine Arts Requirement5

3 - Foreign Language Requirement1

3 - Literature Requirement6

3 - Oral Communication Requirement3

16

Second Semester

3 - ENGL 310 Writing About Literature

3 - Foreign Language Requirement1

3 - Literature Requirement6

6 - Major and Minor Areas

3 - Philosophy/Religion Requirement7

18

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - History Requirement2

9 - Major and Minor Areas

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement3

15

Second Semester

9 - Major and Minor Areas

6 - Elective

15

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - ENGL 496 Senior Seminar

3 - Advanced Social Science Requirement8

9 - Major and Minor Areas

2 - Elective

17

Second Semester

9 - Major and Minor Areas

6 - Elective

15

130 Total Semester Hours

1The equivalent of two years (through 202) in the same foreign language is required.
2See advisor.
3See General Education Requirements.
4Select from CP SC 101, 111, 120, 210.
5Select from A A H 101, 210, ENGL 357, HUM 301, 302, 306, MUSIC 210, 311, 415, 416, THEA 210.
6Select from ENGL 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, H210.
7Select from PHIL 101, 102, 103, REL 101, 102.
8Select any 300- or 400-level social science class.


HISTORY

Bachelor of Arts

The recommended program consists of the required courses in the basic curriculum, plus GEOG 103 or 306 (with consent of instructor) and 30 additional credits in history, including two courses at the 400 level, one of which must be HIST 490. Additional electives are added as needed to meet the minimum of 130 semester hours required for graduation.

Pre-law students majoring in History should consult the departmental advisor for a recommended program.

Freshman Year

First Semester

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - HIST 172 Western Civilization

3 - MTHSC 101 Introduction to Probability1

4 - Foreign Language Requirement

4 - Science Requirement2

17

Second Semester

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - HIST 173 Western Civilization

3 - MTHSC 102 Intro. to Mathematical Analysis1

4 - Foreign Language Requirement

4 - Science Requirement2

17

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - Computer Skills Requirement2

3 - Foreign Language Requirement

3 - Literature Requirement3

9 - Major and Minor Areas

18

Second Semester

6 - Advanced Humanities Requirement4

3 - Foreign Language Requirement

3 - Literature Requirement3

4 - Elective

16
 

Junior Year

First Semester

9 - Major and Minor Areas

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement2

3 - Elective

15

Second Semester

12 - Major and Minor Areas

3 - Oral Communication Requirement2

15

Senior Year

First Semester

6 - Advanced Humanities Requirement4

9 - Major and Minor Areas

2 - Elective

17

Second Semester

9 - Major and Minor Areas

6 - Elective

15

130 Total Semester Hours

1Students may pursue alternate sequences such as the following: MTHSC 101 and 106 or 203; 102 and 207; or 106 and 108, 207, 301.
2See General Education Requirements.
3ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
4See advisor.


LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

As practicing design professionals, landscape architects base their land area design plans on very highly developed design standards and a keen awareness of the environmental and cultural context of the site. Landscape architects are active in the design of regional and city plans, urban designs, urban plazas, city parks and playgrounds, athletic fields, marinas, and other recreational areas. They design housing areas of all types, industrial and office parks, medical and academic campuses, parkways and bike ways, courtyards and backyards.

To succeed in landscape architecture, individuals must first enjoy creating something new or recreating something old. They must also see the study of landscape architecture as a way to improve the environment through an enlightened application of design on the land.

The five-year program leads to the professional degree, Bachelor of Landscape Architecture. Students can use the professional support course requirement to tailor the degree to an area of specialization such as construction, architecture, horticulture, business, city and regional planning, etc. Seniors who have been accepted into Clemson's graduate program in City and Regional Planning may fulfill the Professional Support Requirement with C R P courses, which will also count toward the requirements for the Master of City and Regional Planning Degree. Following completion of the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree, most states require a two- or three-year work experience before taking the professional license examination.
 

Freshman Year

First Semester

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - GEOG 101 Introduction to Geography

3 - GEOL 101 Physical Geology1

1 - GEOL 103 Physical Geology Lab.1

3 - LARCH 151 Basic Design I

1 - LARCH 153 Landscape Arch. Design Theory I

3 - MTHSC 102 Intro. to Mathematical Analysis2

17

Second Semester

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - EX ST 301 Introductory Statistics2

3 - GEOL 112 Earth Resources1

1 - GEOL 114 Earth Resources Lab.1

3 - LARCH 152 Basic Design II

1 - LARCH 154 Landscape Arch. Des. Theory II

3 - Computer Skills Requirement3

1 - Elective

18

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - A A H 101 Survey of Art and Arch. History I

3 - GEOG 305 Cultural Geography

6 - LARCH 251 Basic Design III

3 - Art Requirement4

3 - Oral Communication Requirement3

18

Second Semester

3 - A A H 102 Survey of Art and Arch. History II

3 - AG M 301 Soil and Water Conservation

6 - LARCH 252 Basic Design IV

3 - LARCH 262 Landscape Arch. Technology I

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement3

18

Maymester

3 - LARCH 421 Landscape Architectural Seminar

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - A A H 416 History of Landscape Architecture

2 - B E 221 Surveying for Soil and Water Res.

3 - HORT 303 Plant Materials

6 - LARCH 351 Landscape Arch. Design Studio I

3 - LARCH 362 Landscape Arch. Technology II

17

Second Semester

3 - HORT 101 Horticulture

4 - HORT 461 Problems in Landscape Design

6 - LARCH 352 Landscape Arch. Design II

3 - Computer-Aided Design Requirement5

16

Summer

1 - LARCH 293 Field Studies Internship or
1 - LARCH 493 Prof. Office Internship6
1

Senior Year7

First Semester

6 - LARCH 451 Landscape Arch. Design III

3 - LARCH 462 Landscape Arch. Technology III

3 - Humanities Requirement E.13

3 - Elective

15

Second Semester

6 - LARCH 452 Landscape Arch. Design IV

3 - LARCH 581 Landscape Arch. Prof. Practice

6 - Elective

15

Summer

1 - LARCH 293 Field Studies Internship or
1 - LARCH 493 Prof. Office Internship6
1

Professional Year

First Semester8

15 - Professional Support Requirement9

15

Second Semester

6 - LARCH 552 Landscape Arch. Design VI

7 - Professional Support Requirement9

13

167 Total Semester Hours

1BIOL 101/102, 103/104, or PHYS 207/208 may be substituted.
2MTHSC 106 may substitute for MTHSC 102. MTHSC 301 may substitute for EX ST 301.
3See General Education Requirements.
4Any 200-level ART course.
5ARCH 426, 427, 428, LARCH 428 or other computer-aided design courses as approved.
6Up to six credit hours of LARCH 293 or LARCH 493 may be scheduled during summer sessions.
7Exceptional students may be permitted to spend the spring semester at the Architecture Center in Charleston.
8Exceptional students may be permitted to spend the fall semester at the Daniel Center in Genoa, Italy.
9Select from approved departmental list or as approved in writing by advisor and department chair.


LANGUAGE AND INTERNATIONAL TRADE

Bachelor of Arts

The Bachelor of Arts program in Language and International Trade helps students acquire a basic use of the four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing); a familiarity with specific peoples, cultures, literatures, and business environments; and the knowledge and skills to pursue graduate studies or careers in business.

The Language and International Trade program combines foreign languages and international trade. Students choose one language concentration (French, German, Japanese, or Spanish) and one professional concentration (Applied International Economics, International Trade, Textiles, or Tourism).

A summer internship between the junior and senior years gives students the opportunity to apply classroom learning to a business/industrial work en
vironment. Language and International Trade majors are also encouraged to participate in Study Abroad programs to increase language proficiency.

The language concentration emphasizes speaking and writing skills, culture, civilization, and business/technical languages. The professional component emphasizes international marketing in areas important to the economy of the state and the nation.

In addition to the requirements outlined below, students will be required, as a condition of graduation, to pass a noncredit examination to determine language proficiency. The examination will be taken in the student's last full semester at the University.

Freshman Year

First Semester

3 - CP SC 120 Intro. to Information Technology

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

4 - JAPN 101 Elementary Japanese1

1 - L&IT 127 Intro. to Lang. and International Trade

3 - MTHSC 102 Intro. to Mathematical Analysis

4 - Science Requirement2

14-18

Second Semester

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

4 - FR 102 Elementary French or

4 - GER 102 Elementary German or

4 - JAPN 102 Elementary Japanese or

4 - SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish

3 - HIST 172 Western Civilization

3 - MTHSC 207 Multivariable Calculus

4 - Science Requirement2

17

1Students are expected to have completed the first semester of elementary language in high school or in a Clemson summer session before the first semester of the freshman year, except for Japanese.
2See General Education Requirements.


APPLIED INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS CONCENTRATION

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - AP EC 202 Agricultural Economics

3 - ECON 212 Principles of Macroeconomics

3 - FR 201 Intermediate French or

3 - GER 201 Intermediate German or

3 - JAPN 201 Intermediate Japanese or

3 - SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish

3 - SPCH 251 Business and Professional Speaking

3 - Literature Requirement1

3 - Elective

18

Second Semester

3 - ACCT 201 Financial Accounting Concepts

3 - FR 202 Intermediate French or

3 - GER 202 Intermediate German or

3 - JAPN 202 Intermediate Japanese or

3 - SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish

3 - GEOG 103 World Regional Geography

3 - HIST 173 Western Civilization

6 - Elective

18

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - ENGL 316 Writing and International Trade

3 - FR 305 Intermed. French Conv. and Comp. I or

3 - GER 305 Inter. German Conv. and Comp. or

3 - JAPN 305 Japanese Conv. and Comp. or

3 - SPAN 305 Inter. Spanish Conv. and Comp. I

3 - MKT 301 Principles of Marketing

3 - Advanced Social Science Requirement2

3 - Civilization Requirement3

15

Second Semester

3 - EX ST 462 Statistics Applied to Economics

3 - FR 316 French for International Trade I or

3 - GER 316 German for Int. Trade I or

3 - JAPN 316 Japanese for Int. Trade I or

3 - SPAN 316 Spanish for International Trade I

3 - FR 411 Adv. French Conv. and Comp. or
3 - GER 411 Studies in the German Lang. I or

3 - JAPN 411 Studies in the Japanese Lang. I or

3 - SPAN 411 Adv. Spanish Conv. and Comp.

3 - MKT 427 International Marketing

3 - Foreign Language 300/400-level Requirement4

15

Summer

3 - L&IT 400 L&IT Internship or
3 - L&IT 401 L&IT Practicum
3

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - AP EC 409 Commodity Futures Markets

3 - FR 416 French for International Trade II or

3 - GER 416 German for Int. Trade II or

3 - JAPN 416 Japanese for Int. Trade II or

3 - SPAN 416 Spanish for Int. Trade II

3 - MKT 423 Promotional Strategy

3 - Foreign Language 300/400-level Requirement4

2 - Elective

14

Second Semester

3 - AP EC 420 World Agricultural Trade

3 - ECN 310 International Economy or

3 - ECON 412 International Microeconomics
3 - Fine Arts Requirement5

3 - Foreign Language 300/400-level Requirement4

3 - Elective

15

129-133 Total Semester Hours

1ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
2Twelve hours in social sciences are required at the 300?400 level. This includes AP EC, ANTH, ECON, GEOG, HIST, PO SC, PSYCH, and SOC.
3To be selected from FR, JAPN, or SPAN 307; or FR, GER, JAPN, or SPAN 308; or GER 413; or SPAN 435.
4A minimum of nine hours of 300-400-level foreign language courses is required. At least one course must be in literature. Advanced grammar is recommended for those exempting 100/200 levels.
5Three credits from A A H, MUSIC, or THEA (practica with the approval of the department chair).


INTERNATIONAL TRADE CONCENTRATION

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - ECON 211 Principles of Microeconomics

3 - FR 201 Intermediate French or

3 - GER 201 Intermediate German or

3 - JAPN 201 Intermediate Japanese or

3 - SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish

3 - HIST 173 Western Civilization

3 - SPCH 251 Business and Professional Speaking

3 - Advanced Social Science Requirement1

3 - Literature Requirement2

18

Second Semester

3 - ACCT 201 Financial Accounting Concepts

3 - FR 202 Intermediate French or

3 - GER 202 Intermediate German or

3 - JAPN 202 Intermediate Japanese or

3 - SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish

3 - LAW 322 Legal Environment of Business

3 - Advanced Social Science Requirement1

3 - Elective

15

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - ECON 310 International Economy or

3 - ECON 412 International Microeconomics
3 - ENGL 316 Writing and International Trade

3 - FR 305 Intermed. French Conv. and Comp. I or

3 - GER 305 Inter. German Conv. and Comp. or

3 - JAPN 305 Japanese Conv. and Comp. or

3 - SPAN 305 Inter. Spanish Conv. and Comp. I

3 - MKT 301 Principles of Marketing

3 - Civilization Requirement3

15

Second Semester

3 - FR 316 French for International Trade I or

3 - GER 316 German for Int. Trade I or

3 - JAPN 316 Japanese for Int. Trade I or

3 - SPAN 316 Spanish for International Trade I

3 - FR 411 Adv. French Conv. and Comp. or
3 - GER 411 Studies in the German Lang. I or

3 - JAPN 411 Studies in the Japanese Lang. I or

3 - SPAN 411 Adv. Spanish Conv. and Comp.

3 - MKT 427 International Marketing

3 - MTHSC 301 Statistical Theory and Methods I

3 - Foreign Language 300/400-level Requirement4

3 - Elective

18

Summer

3 - L&I 400 L&IT Internship or
3 - L&IT 401 L&IT Practicum


3

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - FIN 306 Corporation Finance

3 - FR 416 French for International Trade II or

3 - GER 416 German for Int. Trade II or

3 - JAPN 416 Japanese for Int. Trade II or

3 - SPAN 416 Spanish for Int. Trade II

3 - MGT 301 Principles of Management

3 - Advanced Social Science Requirement1

3 - Foreign Language 300/400-level Requirement4

15

Second Semester

3 - MGT 418 Management Information Systems

3 - MGT 424 Int. Transportation and Logistics

3 - Fine Arts Requirement5

3 - Foreign Language 300/400-level Requirement4

6 - Elective

18

133-137 Total Semester Hours

1Twelve hours in social sciences are required at the 300?400 level. This includes AP EC, ANTH, ECON, GEOG, HIST, PO SC, PSYCH, and SOC.
2ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
3To be selected from FR, JAPN, or SPAN 307; or FR, GER, JAPN, or SPAN 308; or GER 413; or SPAN 435.
4A minimum of nine hours of 300-400-level foreign language courses is required. At least one course must be in literature. Advanced grammar is recommended for those exempting 100/200 levels.
5Three credits from A A H, MUSIC, or THEA (practica with the approval of the department chair).


TEXTILES CONCENTRATION

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - ECON 211 Principles of Microeconomics or

3 - ECON 212 Principles of Macroeconomics
3 - FR 201 Intermediate French or
3 - GER 201 Intermediate German or

3 - JAPN 201 Intermediate Japanese or

3 - SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish

3 - SPCH 251 Business and Professional Speaking

3 - TEXT 460 Textile Processes

3 - Literature Requirement1

3 - Elective

18

Second Semester

3 - ACCT 201 Financial Accounting Concepts

3 - FR 202 Intermediate French or

3 - GER 202 Intermediate German or

3 - JAPN 202 Intermediate Japanese or

3 - SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish

3 - HIST 173 Western Civilization

6 - Advanced Social Science Requirement2

3 - Elective

18

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - ENGL 316 Writing and International Trade

3 - FR 305 Intermed. French Conv. and Comp. I or

3 - GER 305 Inter. German Conv. and Comp. or

3 - JAPN 305 Japanese Conv. and Comp. or

3 - SPAN 305 Inter. Spanish Conv. and Comp. I

3 - MKT 301 Principles of Marketing

4 - TEXT 314 Chemical Processing of Textiles

3 - Civilization Requirement3

16

Second Semester

3 - FR 316 French for International Trade I or

3 - GER 316 German for Int. Trade I or

3 - JAPN 316 Japanese for Int. Trade I or

3 - SPAN 316 Spanish for International Trade I

3 - FR 411 Adv. French Conv. and Comp. or
3 - GER 411 Studies in the German Lang. I or

3 - JAPN 411 Studies in the Japanese Lang. I or

3 - SPAN 411 Adv. Spanish Conv. and Comp.

4 - TEXT 308 Apparel

3 - Foreign Language 300/400-level Requirement4

3 - Elective

16

Summer

3 - L&IT 400 L&IT Internship or
3 - L&IT 401 L&IT Practicum
3

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - FR 416 French for International Trade II or

3 - GER 416 German for Int. Trade II or

3 - JAPN 416 Japanese for Int. Trade II or

3 - SPAN 416 Spanish for Int. Trade II

3 - MKT 427 International Marketing

3 - TEXT 422 Properties of Textile Structures

3 - Advanced Social Science Requirement2

3 - Foreign Language 300/400-level Requirement4

15

Second Semester

3 - ECON 310 International Economy or

3 - ECON 412 International Microeconomics
3 - TEXT 475 Textile Marketing

3 - Fine Arts Requirement5

3 - Foreign Language 300/400-level Requirement4

4 - Elective

16

133-137 Total Semester Hours

1ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
2Twelve hours in social sciences are required at the 300?400 level. This includes AP EC, ANTH, ECON, GEOG, HIST, PO SC, PSYCH, and SOC.
3To be selected from FR, JAPN, or SPAN 307; or FR, GER, JAPN, or SPAN 308; or GER 413; or SPAN 435.
4A minimum of nine hours of 300-400-level foreign language courses is required. At least one course must be in literature. Advanced grammar is recommended for those exempting 100/200 levels.
5Three credits from A A H, MUSIC, or THEA (practica with the approval of the department chair).


TOURISM CONCENTRATION

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - ECON 211 Principles of Microeconomics

3 - FR 01 Intermediate French or

3 - GER 201 Intermediate German or

3 - JAPN 201 Intermediate Japanese or

3 - SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish

3 - PRTM 342 Introduction to Tourism

3 - SPCH 251 Business and Professional Speaking

3 - Literature Requirement1

3 - Elective

18

Second Semester

3 - ACCT 201 Financial Accounting Concepts

3 - FR 202 Intermediate French or

3 - GER 202 Intermediate German or

3 - JAPN 202 Intermediate Japanese or

3 - SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish

3 - HIST 173 Western Civilization

6 - Advanced Social Science Requirement2

3 - Elective

18

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - ENGL 316 Writing and International Trade

3 - FR 305 Intermed. French Conv. and Comp. I or

3 - GER 305 Inter. German Conv. and Comp. or

3 - JAPN 305 Japanese Conv. and Comp. or

3 - SPAN 305 Inter. Spanish Conv. and Comp. I

3 - MKT 301 Principles of Marketing

3 - PRTM 343 Spatial Aspects of Tourist Behavior

3 - Civilization Requirement3

15

Second Semester

3 - FR 316 French for International Trade I or

3 - GER 316 German for Int. Trade I or

3 - JAPN 316 Japanese for Int. Trade I or

3 - SPAN 316 Spanish for International Trade I

3 - FR 411 Adv. French Conv. and Comp. or
3 - GER 411 Studies in the German Lang. I or

3 - JAPN 411 Studies in the Japanese Lang. I or

3 - SPAN 411 Adv. Spanish Conv. and Comp.

3 - Foreign Language 300/400-level Requirement4

3 - PRTM 300/400-level Requirement5

3 - Elective

15

Summer

3 - L&IT 400 L&IT Internship or
3 - L&IT 401 L&IT Practicum
3

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - FR 416 French for International Trade II or

3 - GER 416 German for Int. Trade II or

3 - JAPN 416 Japanese for Int. Trade II or

3 - SPAN 416 Spanish for Int. Trade II

3 - MKT 427 International Marketing

3 - PRTM 444 Tour Planning and Operations

3 - Advanced Social Science Requirement2

3 - Foreign Language 300/400-level Requirement4

15

Second Semester

3 - ECON 310 International Economy or

3 - ECON 412 International Microeconomics
3 - PRTM 447 Perspectives on International Travel

3 - Fine Arts Requirement6

3 - Foreign Language 300/400-level Requirement4

6 - Elective

18

133-137 Total Semester Hours

1ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
2Twelve hours in social sciences are required at the 300?400 level. This includes AP EC, ANTH, ECON, GEOG, HIST, PO SC, PSYCH, and SOC.
3To be selected from FR, JAPN, or SPAN 307; or FR, GER, JAPN, or SPAN 308; or GER 413; or SPAN 435.
4A minimum of nine hours of 300?400-level foreign language courses is required. At least one course must be in literature. Advanced grammar is recommended for those exempting 100/200 levels.
5Three credits in PRTM at the 300-400 level, approved by the Language and International Trade Director.
6Three credits from A A H, MUSIC, or THEA (practica with the approval of the department chair).


MODERN LANGUAGES

Bachelor of Arts

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Modern Languages helps students acquire a basic use of the four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing); a familiarity with specific peoples, cultures, and literatures; and the knowledge and foreign-language skills to pursue graduate studies or careers in education or business. All Modern Language majors are encouraged to travel/study abroad.

A student may elect a major in a single language, a double major in two languages, or a double major combining a language major with a Bachelor of Arts major outside the department. All Modern Language majors must complete the courses stipulated in the basic curriculum.

French--Requires FR 305 and 309 plus 24 additional credits in French at the 300-400 level. Six credits of literature courses, three credits of which must be at the 400 level, are required.

German--Requires 24 credits in German at the 300-400-level.

Spanish--Requires 30 credits at the 300--400 levels, of which nine credits must be at the 400 level. A minimum of six credit hours of literature, including one course at the 400 level, is also required.

As a condition of graduation, students are required to pass a noncredit examination to determine their proficiency in the area. This examination is taken in the student's last full semester at the University.

Freshman Year

First Semester

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - HIST 172 Western Civilization

3 - MTHSC 101 Introduction to Probability1

4 - Foreign Language Requirement

4 - Science Requirement2

17

Second Semester

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - HIST 173 Western Civilization

3 - MTHSC 102 Intro. to Mathematical Analysis1

4 - Foreign Language Requirement

4 - Science Requirement2

17

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - Computer Skills Requirement2

3 - Fine Arts Requirement3

3 - Foreign Language Requirement

3 - Literature Requirement4

6 - Elective

18

Second Semester

3 - Advanced Social Science Requirement5

3 - Foreign Language Requirement

3 - Literature Requirement4

7 - Elective

16

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - Advanced Social Science Requirement5

9 - Major and Minor Areas

3 - Oral Communication Requirement2

15

Second Semester

12 - Major and Minor Areas

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement2

15

Senior Year

First Semester

9 - Major and Minor Areas

8 - Elective

17

Second Semester

6 - Advanced Social Science Requirement5

9 - Major and Minor Areas

15

130 Total Semester Hours

1Students may pursue alternate sequences such as the following: MTHSC 101 and 106 or 203; 102 and 207; or 106 and 108, 207, or 301.
2See General Education Requirements.
3Three credits from A A H, MUSIC, THEA (practica with the approval of the department chair).
4ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
5See advisor.


PHILOSOPHY

Bachelor of Arts

The required course of study consists of the basic curriculum and either the standard Philosophy major, the Philosophy major with a Religious Studies Emphasis Area, or the Philosophy major with a Law, Liberty, and Justice Emphasis Area.

The standard Philosophy major consists of PHIL 315, 316, 401 or 402, and 24 additional credits in philosophy selected with the advice and consent of a departmental advisor; three of these 24 credits may be at the 100 level. Additional electives are added as needed to meet the minimum of 130 semester hours required for graduation.

The Philosophy major with a Religious Studies Emphasis Area consists of REL 101 or 102, 301, 302, 401 or 402, PHIL 303, 315, 316, 401 or 402, and nine additional credits selected with the advice and consent of a departmental advisor. Of these nine credits, three must be in philosophy and three must be in religion at the 300 level or above. The remaining three credits may be in either religion or philosophy but must be at the 300 level or above. Students with this emphasis area must choose a minor other than religion. Additional electives are added as needed to meet the minimum of 130 semester hours required for graduation.

The Philosophy major with a Law, Liberty, and Justice Emphasis Area consists of PHIL 102, 304 or 320 or 321, 315, 316, 343, 401 or 402, HIST 328, 329, and nine additional credits in philosophy selected with the advice and consent of the departmental pre-law advisor. Students with this emphasis area are strongly advised to partially fulfill their advanced social science requirement by taking one or more of PO SC 432, 433, 434. Additional electives are added as needed to meet the minimum of 130 semester hours required for graduation.

Pre-law and Pre-med students majoring in Philosophy should consult the departmental advisor for help in tailoring the program to their needs.

Freshman Year

First Semester

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - HIST 172 Western Civilization

3 - MTHSC 101 Introduction to Probability1

4 - Foreign Language Requirement

4 - Science Requirement2

17

Second Semester

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - HIST 173 Western Civilization

3 - MTHSC 102 Intro. to Mathematical Analysis1

4 - Foreign Language Requirement

4 - Science Requirement2

17

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - Foreign Language Requirement

3 - Literature Requirement3

9 - Major and Minor Areas

3 - Oral Communication Requirement2

18

Second Semester

3 - Computer Skills Requirement2

3 - Foreign Language Requirement

3 - Literature Requirement3

7 - Elective

16

Junior Year

First Semester

9 - Major and Minor Areas

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement2

3 - Elective

15

Second Semester

12 - Major and Minor Areas

3 - Elective

15

Senior Year

First Semester

6 - Advanced Social Sciences Requirement4

11 - Major and Minor Areas

17

Second Semester

6 - Advanced Social Sciences Requirement4

9 - Major and Minor Areas

15

130 Total Semester Hours

1Students may pursue alternate sequences such as the following: MTHSC 101 and 106 or 203; 102 and 207; or 106 and 108, 207, or 301.
2See General Education Requirements.
3ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
4See advisor.


PRODUCTION STUDIES IN PERFORMING ARTS

Bachelor of Arts

The Bachelor of Arts in Production Studies in Performing Arts is a distinctive program that combines the disciplines of music and theatre. The curriculum includes practical hands-on experience in performing arts production technologies with classes in performance, history, and theory. The curriculum allows students to choose from over 70 minors to tailor the program to their specific interests. The program integrates multidisciplinary and collaborative performing arts, teamwork, outreach, and service learning with traditional performance.

The degree is rooted in the liberal arts tradition with specific training in the performing arts. It provides the background for a number of career options or advanced studies, including graduate school, professional internships, and specialized post-graduate training.

The curriculum features a senior "capstone" project in which students spend their final year working as a production team, writing, composing, designing, marketing, and performing a final project.

To be considered for admission to this program, students must undergo an interview and/or audition with the Department of Performing Arts. Please note that students will not be eligible for admission to Clemson University in Production Studies in Performing Arts until this process is completed. Contact the department for specific requirements.

MUSIC CONCENTRATION

Freshman Year

First Semester

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

1 - MUSIC 153 Applied Music for Majors

3 - MUSIC 180 Intro. to Music Technology

3 - P A 101 Introduction to Performing Arts

4 - Foreign Language Requirement1

1 - Large Ensemble Requirement2

15

Second Semester

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

1 - MUSIC 154 Applied Music for Majors

3 - Computer Skills Requirement3

4 - Foreign Language Requirement1

1 - Large Ensemble Requirement2

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement3

15
 

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - MUSIC 205 Music Theory I

1 - MUSIC 253 Applied Music for Majors

1 - P A 201 Performing Arts Seminar I

3 - Foreign Language Requirement1

3 - Humanities Requirement E.13

1 - Large Ensemble Requirement2

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement3

3 - Oral Communication Requirement3

18

Second Semester

3 - MUSIC 206 Music Theory II

1 - MUSIC 254 Applied Music for Majors

1 - P A 279 Performing Arts Laboratory

3 - Foreign Language Requirement1

1 - Large Ensemble Requirement2

3 - Social Science Requirement3

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement3

15

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - MUSIC 310 Survey of Music History

1 - MUSIC 353 Applied Music for Majors

1 - P A 301 Performing Arts Seminar II

3 - Humanities Requirement E.24

3 - Social Science Requirement3

4 - Science Requirement3

3 - Minor

18

Second Semester

1 - MUSIC 354 Applied Music for Majors

3 - MUSIC 480 Advanced Music Technology

1 - P A 279 Performing Arts Lab.

6 - Minor

4 - Science Requirement3

3 - Elective

18

Senior Year

First Semester

1 - P A 401 Senior Project Research

3 - Minor

12 - Elective

16

Second Semester

3 - P A 402 Senior Project

3 - Minor

9 - Elective

15

130 Total Semester Hours

1Four semesters of the same modern foreign language are required.
2Select from MUSIC 361 (maximum two credits in combination with MUSIC 364), 362, 363, 364 (maximum two credits in combination with MUSIC 361), 369, 370, 371, 372. Keyboard students must take a minimum of one hour each of MUSIC 323, Applied Organ, and Applied Carillon.
3See General Education Requirements.
4Select from A A H 101, HUM 301, 302, 306, THEA 210.


THEATRE CONCENTRATION

Freshman Year

First Semester

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - P A 101 Introduction to Performing Arts

4 - Foreign Language Requirement1

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement2

3 - Oral Communication Requirement2

16

Second Semester

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - THEA 278 Acting I

1 - THEA 279 Theatre Laboratory

3 - Computer Skills Requirement2

4 - Foreign Language Requirement1

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement2

17

Sophomore Year

First Semester

1 - P A 201 Performing Arts Seminar I

3 - THEA (ENGL) 347 Structure of Drama

3 - THEA 377 Stagecraft

3 - Foreign Language Requirement1

3 - Humanities Requirement E.23

3 - Social Science Requirement2

16

Second Semester

1 - P A 279 Performing Arts Laboratory

3 - Foreign Language Requirement1

3 - Humanities Requirement E.12

3 - Social Science Requirement2

3 - Theatre 300/400-level Requirement

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement2

16

Junior Year

First Semester

1 - P A 301 Performing Arts Seminar II

3 - THEA 315 Theatre History I

3 - THEA 376 Stage Directing I

4 - Science Requirement2

3 - Minor

3 - Elective

17

Second Semester

1 - P A 279 Performing Arts Laboratory

3 - THEA 316 Theatre History II

3 - Minor

4 - Science Requirement2

3 - Theatre 400-level Requirement

3 - Elective

17

Senior Year

First Semester

1 - P A 401 Senior Project Research

6 - Minor

9 - Elective

16

Second Semester

3 - P A 402 Senior Project

3 - Minor

9 - Elective

15

130 Total Semester Hours

1Four semesters of the same modern foreign language are required.
2See General Education Requirements.
3Select from A A H 101, HUM 301, 302, 306, MUSIC 210.


SPEECH AND COMMUNICATION STUDIES

Bachelor of Arts
The Bachelor of Arts in Speech and Communication Studies is designed to provide a thoroughly integrated yet individual degree program that will prepare students for careers in business, government, and public sectors. In addition, the program provides a foundation for graduates who wish to pursue advanced degrees in the humanities, social sciences, business, and law. Speech and Communication Studies examines communication in a variety of contexts. Students will select an emphasis area that is germane to individual career interests: Organizational Studies, Media Studies, or Relational/Cultural Studies.

SPCH 250 or 251 is required of all Speech and Communication Studies majors.

I. Core Courses (15 hours)

SPCH 201

SPCH 301

SPCH 310

SPCH 360 or 361

SPCH 495

II. Emphasis Areas (12 hours)
Organizational StudiesS--PCH 364, 464, and two courses from SPCH 340, 362, 460.

Media Studies--SPCH 302, 365, and two courses from ENGL 357, SPCH 300, 320.

Relational/Cultural Studies--SPCH 348, 480, and two courses from SPCH 330, 350, 455.

III. General Requirements (9 hours)

Any 300- or 400-level speech course. Additional courses taken under an emphasis area may also be used to fulfill this requirement.

36 total hours

Advanced Social Science Requirement (12 hours)

Electives as needed to complete 130 hours
 

Freshman Year

First Semester

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - HIST 172 Western Civilization

4 - Foreign Language Requirement

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement1

4 - Science Requirement1

17

Second Semester

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - HIST 173 Western Civilization

4 - Foreign Language Requirement

3 - Mathematical Sciences Requirement1

4 - Science Requirement1

17

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - SPCH 250 Public Speaking or

3 - SPCH 251 Business and Prof. Speaking

3 - Computer Skills Requirement1

3 - Foreign Language Requirement

3 - Literature Requirement2

6 - Elective

18

Second Semester

3 - Advanced Social Science Requirement3

3 - Foreign Language Requirement

3 - Literature Requirement2

6 - Major and Minor Areas

1 - Elective

16

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - Advanced Social Science Requirement3

9 - Major and Minor Areas

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement1

15

Second Semester

15 - Major and Minor Areas

15

Senior Year

First Semester

3 - Advanced Social Science Requirement3

12 - Major and Minor Areas

2 - Elective

17

Second Semester

3 - Advanced Social Science Requirement3

9 - Major and Minor Areas

3 - Elective

15

130 Total Semester Hours

1See General Education Requirements.
2ENGL 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, or H210.
3See advisor.

Note: Students requesting a transfer into the Speech and Communication Studies program with fewer than 50 hours must have a grade-point ratio of 2.3 or higher. Students requesting a transfer into the Speech and Communication Studies program with 50 hours or more must have a grade-point ratio of 2.5 or higher.


VISUAL ARTS

Bachelor of Fine Arts

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree is the recognized professional undergraduate degree in the visual arts. The program in Visual Arts prepares students interested in a balanced curriculum of academic course work and studio art and art history courses for careers in studio-related areas of the visual arts.

Students begin to concentrate their studio course work in a specific area of the visual artsceramics, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, or sculpturein the junior year in preparation for the senior studio experience. The program is structured so that the concentrated studio experiences in the junior year allow students opportunities to explore and develop concepts and skills that lead to a cohesive body of artwork in the senior year and a portfolio for professional application or graduate study.

Freshman Year

First Semester

3 - A A H 101 Survey of Art and Arch. History I

3 - ART 151 Foundations in 2D Art

1 - ART 153 Orientation to Visual Arts I

3 - ART 205 Beginning Drawing

3 - ENGL 101 Composition I

3 - MTHSC 101 Introduction to Probability

16

Second Semester

3 - A A H 102 Survey of Art and Arch. History II

3 - ART 152 Foundations in 3D Art

1 - ART 154 Orientation to Visual Arts II

3 - ART 207 Beginning Painting

3 - ENGL 102 Composition II

3 - MTHSC 102 Intro. to Mathematical Analysis

16

Sophomore Year

First Semester

3 - A A H 205 History and Theory of Art I

3 - ART 209 Beginning Sculpture

3 - ART 211 Beginning Printmaking

3 - Computer Skills Requirement1

4 - Science Requirement1

16

Second Semester

3 - A A H 206 History and Theory of Art II

3 - ART 213 Beginning Photography

3 - ART 217 Beginning Ceramics

3 - ART 305 Drawing

4 - Science Requirement1

16

Junior Year

First Semester

3 - A A H 305 Contemporary Art History

6 - Art 300/400 Requirement

3 - Studio Requirement2

3 - Writing Intensive Requirement1

3 - Elective

18

Second Semester

6 - Art 300/400 Requirement

3 - Humanities Requirement E.11

3 - Oral Communication Requirement1

3 - Studio Requirement2

3 - Elective

18

Senior Year

First Semester

5 - ART 471 BFA Senior Studio I

3 - Art 300/400 Requirement

3 - Social Science Requirement1

3 - Studio Requirement2

3 - Elective

17

Second Semester

5 - ART 472 BFA Senior Studio II

3 - Art 300/400 Requirement

3 - Social Science Requirement1

3 - Studio Requirement2

3 - Elective

17

134 Total Semester Hours

1See General Education Requirements.
2All ART courses and other courses approved by the major advisor.
 


MINORS

Following are minors acceptable for students in the College of Architecture, Arts, and Humanities. Students cannot major and minor in the same field or acquire a minor that is not allowed by the degree program.

Students in Landscape Architecture are not eligible to claim a minor.

Accounting

Adult/Extension Education

Aerospace Studies

African American Studies

Agricultural Business Management

Agricultural Mechanization and Business

Anthropology

Aquaculture, Fisheries, and Wildlife Biology

Beef Cattle Production

Biochemistry

Bioengineering

Biological Sciences

Business Administration

Chemistry

Cluster

Communications

Computer Science

Crop and Soil Environmental Science

Early Intervention Specialist--not open to Visual Arts majors

East Asian Studies

Economics

Elementary Education

English

Entomology

Entrepreneurship

Environmental Engineering

Environmental Science and Policy

Film Studies

Financial Management

Fine Arts

Food Science

Forest Products

Forest Resource Management

Geography

Geology

Great Works

Health Science

History

Horse Production

Horticulture

Human Resource Management

International Politics

Legal Studies

Management

Mathematical Sciences

Microbiology

Military Science

Modern Languages--not open to Language and International Trade majors

Music

Natural Resource Economics

Operations Management

Packaging Science

Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management

Philosophy

Physics

Plant Pathology

Political Science

Poultry Science

Psychology

Public Policy

Religion

Science and Technology in Society

Screenwriting

Secondary Education

Sociology

Spanish-American Area Studies

Speech and Communication Studies

Textiles

Theatre

Urban Forestry

Women's Studies

Writing

See Minors, Programs, and Degrees for details.